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WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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EDUCATION 

1946 



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CHARLES W. GOODRICH 

Headmaster 



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FACULTY 



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WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY' 
John W. McDevitt, Superintendent of Schools 

Charles W. Goodrich. Headmaster 
George L. Ward. Muster 



Alfred T. Hodge 


Sul 


*-Master 


LiONEl M. Mosher. Sub-Master 


Ralph C Hollis. 


Sub 


- Waster 


Francis E. Sheehv. Sub-Master 


Miriam C Allen 




William J. Gallagher 


Margaret M.Nolan 


Pauline Babb 




James Garrahan 


Alice N. Rigby 


Virginia Betts 




Anne C. Graverson 


Thomas A. Roach 


Evelyn Bliss 




Myrtle L. Grovcr 


Constance Ruwi 


Walter E. Brinn 




Urania B. Hart 


Louise Sewall 


Muriel F. Brown 




Helen G. Hirst 


Celia M. Spencer 


Eleanor W. Shilds 




Richard F. Hood 


Dorothv M Stewart 


Lilla E. Clement 




John L Leary 


Rub] I Viets 


Miriam F. Cunningham 




George W. Lees 


George s Woodman 


Paul F. Curry 




M.irv M.ulden 


( irate I. Woodward 


Arline B. Darmedy 




Dorothy Mankowich 


M. nc Geisler, ( 


Ethelyn Nolan Devine 




Louise G. McCuIlough 


Lorraine Basle \ 


Thelma L Eaton 




Esther F, Mehring 


Isabel Harpoothan. 1 


Lawrence W. Elliott 




Donald B. Mitchell 


Dorotrrj Minch, v 


Harriet I Flagg 




M.u\ ( Mooney 
Almon \V Morang 

1\ IHI s[ RVK 1 


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Francis M ( urran 


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Marion 1 


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THE MIRROR 

"-to ixolb a» 'tfaere, tt|« mirror up to nature" 
Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 



Editorial Staff 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Leon Greene 

ASSISTANT EDITOR 

Howard Read 

SPORTS' EDITORS (Girls) SPORTS' EDITORS (Boys) 

Marie Dorval Richard Tolan 

Marjorie Gardner Ernest Zeno 

POETRY EDITOR DRAMATICS EDITOR 

Elizabeth Hodgdon Shirlie Babb 

MUSIC EDITORS ALUMNI EDITORS 

Jane Flagg Frances Barrow- 

Philip Pearson Lois Coolidge 

HUMOR EDITOR EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Janet Turner Charlotte Leavy 

GOSSIP EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Joan Morang David Law 

Hector McLean 
ART STAFF 

Norma Read Kathleen LeLievre Virginia Johnson Theresa Chaisson 

Arthur O'Leary Donald Meade Beatrice Koulopoulos James Davini 

SPECIAL WRITE-UP STAFF 

Room 115 — Kathleen McCusker, Lorraine Crane 

Room 214 — Helen Waterhouse, George Dolan 

Room 203 — Joan Morang, Jane Flagg, William Power 

Room 114 — Joan Home, Frederick Parkhurst 

Room 118 — June Dacey, Paula Franchina 

Room 112 ■ — Richard Dugan, Irving Haynes 

Room 109 — Helen Chase, Alice Kelley, Theresa Hayes 

BUSINESS MANAGERS 

Fay Wenckus Amelia Cardillo 

BUSINESS AND ADVERTISING STAFF 

Leon Simmons Walter Beckett Marilvn Gowell 

Robert Sivewright Lois Coolidge Jean Storer 

Virginia Johnson Paul Ouellette Joan Lavash 

Doris Becudoin Reynold Famosi Elizabeth Jackson 

Marielle Plamondon Peggy Higgins Joan Morang 

Shirley Cassell Theresa Hayes Jane Gardner 

Roger Arsenault Arthur Notargiacomo Melvin Drapkin 

Beverly Peterson Flora Gray Phyllis Dowcetl 

Thomas Callahan Phyllis Caplan Ann Getz 

Lorraine Crane Patricia Starmer Elaine Lindstrom 

Joan Pappas Allred Shaw Gerald Dearborn 

Theresa Chaisson Robert Flannery Howard Read 

William Frary Waldemar Tilly Barbara Hunter 

STAFF SECRETARY 
Theresa Hayes 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Literary Department Miss Viets 

Business Department Mr Hood 

Art Department Mrs. Devine, Miss Russo 

Arrangement, Make-up and Presswork by the Pupils of the Arthur A. Hansen Trade School Printing 

Shop under the direction ol Mr. J. H. Nottenburg 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
Standing: — -Irving Haynes. Auditor; Richard Stumpf 
President; Seated: Frances Barrow, Secretary-Treasurer; 

Fay Wenckus, Vice- President 




GEORG1 I WARD 

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ADAMS, JAMES FRANCIS 

Practical Arts Course 

If, at the basketball game, you 
hear. "A Lucky Strike if you sink 
it!" you'l know "Buttsy" has the 
ball. This well-liked senior is one 
ot the "gang" who occupy the lit- 
tle cubby-holes down in the "caf". 
We're all confident in his future 
success. 

Basketball, III, IV. 



ALLEN, CRAIG THOMSON 

College Course 

Craig admits that his ambition is 
to become a mortician. Although 
he says he has no virtues, he likes 
going to movies, drawing cartoons, 
making records, eating lobsters, 
dancing, and calling taxis. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



ANDREWS, SYBIL MARIE 

College Course 

Sib's heartfelt ambition is to 
blow up the Chemistry labratory 
and thus save future seniors, or 
to write a book entitled "Forever 
Homework." Her dislikes are lima 
beans and crying babies, and her 
likes are novels, C. G., and writ- 
ing notes to Kay in chemistry. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 



ARBUTHNOT, KENNETH ROY 

College Course 

"Lazy" plans to attend Michigan 
State and become a successful 
basketball coach. His chief virtues 
are doing homework, being quiet, 
and always having a friendly 
smile f o r everyone. Another 
women-hater, Roy dislikes German 
and vocabulary tests but is hap- 
piest when playing basketball. 

Vice-President of Freshman 
Class I. 

North Junior Coach III. 

Basketball II, III, IV. 

Tech Tourney II. 

Honor Roll I, II. 



AUCOIN, WINFRED GERARD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Pappy" intends to join the navy 
if the Peacetime Military Training 
Bill doesn't get him first. Gerard 
likes playing softball, basketball, 
bowling, and taking part in a little 
fun in 114. He dislikes getting in- 
volved with restless teachers 
(shades of 214!), homework, and 
girls who smoke in public. His 
sparkling wit, frank comments on 
the world about him, and good 
humor have added many moments 
of hilarity for all. Intelligent, re- 
sourceful, and friendly, Gerard 
will make a success of whatever 
he attempts. 

Honor Roll I, II. 



AHLSTRAND, KARL W. 

Technical Course 

Karly intends to go to M.I.T- to 
study Mechanical Engineering. He 
claims innocence as his chief vir- 
tue and says he dislikes Ke2er's 
copying, the quiet German classes, 
and the draft board. 

President IV-B Homework Ex- 
change. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



ANDERSON, FRANCIS JOSEPH, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Andy, who has been outstanding 
as one of Waltham's star hockey 
players, intends to carry thai abil- 
ity into his future life and make it 
pay — not, however, before he has 
served in the Marines. Like most 
of us he dislikes doing homework, 
but likes going to the show on 
Sunday nights. This popular lad 
cannot fail to make a good place 
for himself in the future. 

Hockey III, IV. 

Baseball III, IV. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 



ANSARA, JAMES 

Technical Course 

"Popeye" is that well-liked IV-B 
fellow who wants to make his 
millions as an engineer after grad- 
uating from Tufts or Northeastern. 
Modest and good-natured, he likes 
claying golf and basketball, keep- 
ing W. J. close to W. P., D. L.'s 
theory, W. J.'s haircut, E. R.'s 
(raisins), and listening to Bing 
Crosby's records. "What did pop- 
eye say?" and "Watta A., Watta 
A." are his pet expressions, but 
he dislikes "die (Aufgabe)", crib- 
bing, and Chet's Magnitude. 

Basketball II, III. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 



ARRIGO, ANGELA MADELINE 

Accounting Course 

Called "Toots" by all of her 
friends, Angela aims to be a tele- 
phone operator. Pickles and after 
school chats with Anne are tops on 
her list. People who are always 
early and homework are out. 
Here's hoping you succeed, 
"Toots"! 



AYLSWORTH, JOHN EDWARD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Alley" dislikes people who 
chew gum in public, but likes R. 
K. O. stage shows and traveling. 
Ail who know John are won over 
by his jovial personality, ambition, 
and practical perseverance. After 
he graduates, "Ayles" hopes to do 
some traveling to see some of 
those places mentioned in his his- 
tory and geography books. Good 
luck, John. 



BABBS, SHERLIE MAE 

College Course 

Leland Powers bound, Sherlie 
loves children and acting. Her 
virtue is ' her, ever cheerful, opti- 
mistic a t t i t'u d e. Gloomy Guses 
just aren't when she's around. She 
has no sympathy, however, for 
poor sports, onions, cliques, and 
homework.' Sherlie attended May- 
nard High in 1942. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

President Dramatic Club IV. 

Baseball I. II. 

Archery III. 

Volley Ball I, III, IV. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Eadminton I, III. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Senior Play Chairman IV. 

BALLO, JOSEPHINE MARIE 

Accounting Course 

Jo's ambition is to become a 
bookkeeper. If you hear someone 
say "Golly Moses," then you know 
she's right behind you. Music, 
dancing, and long walks go far 
with Jo. People who always make 
a fuss over little things are "nix". 



BARROW, FRANCES ARNELIA 

College Course 

Fran likes sports, horse races, 
movies, sentimental songs— espec- 
ially "Always" and a little ditty 
called "The Silver Trumpet," and 
the other Frannie. She particu- 
larly dislikes writing letters of any 
length or -waiting for anyone. 
P'ran's destination is Simmons and 
she intends to travel. 

Class Secretary-Treasurer III, IV. 

Volleyball I, II, III, IV. 

Nominating Committee IV. 

Bowling I, II, III, IV. 

Alumni Editor, Mirror IV. 

Secretary-Treasurer South Jr. 

Alumni IV. 

Basketball I. II, III, IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

BAXTER, FREDERICK GERARD 

Practical Arts Course 

Dilhgent, hard-working, studious, 
ambitious — yes, that's Fred. This 
young man "has been taking 
courses in Radio Engineering. Bent 
or. making investfgations, his ex- 
ecutive ability and perseverance 
will undoubtedly make him an 
efficient member of the business 
world He has a general dislike 
for unreliable automobiles (espec- 
ially, Fords), and people with no 
sensj of humor Fred tells us that 
soon he will be in the Army Air 
Corps 

St Mary's .'42. 

BOUDREAU. JEANETTE ALICE 

Stenographic Course 

No one will ever have to wait 
for "Frenchy"; who is always on 
time and detests waiting for others 
To be a private secretary to "R 
E " is Jeanette's burning ambition, 
and we have no doubt that she 
will succeed. 

Honor Roll II. 



BAKER. BARBARA E. 

Business Machines Course 
Quiet, yes, very quiet but capa- 
ble, too. Babs hopes to obtain an 
office position when she graduates. 
People that are too serious don't 
fit into her life. Lending a help- 
ing hand to the other girls in 
democracy and economics has 
made her one of the best-liked 
members of our senior class. 
Honor Roll II. 



BAMFORTH, ELEANOR TERESA 
Business Machines Course 
Barn's voice and personality 
match. May she obtain that job 
as singer for a band that she so 
desires. Dancing at "Tote", meet- 
ing new acquaintances, Vaughn 
Monroe's orchestra, and writing to 
a certain Newton G I keep her 
hcpes high. Conceited people and 
staying in nights bore her. 
Football Usher II, III. IV. 
Class Day Usher III. 



BARTLETT, RICHARD EARL 

Acounting Course 

Dick's destination is the U. S 
Navy. He says his best virtue is 
doing his homework. He dislikes 
conceited people and getting up 
early. 

Hockey II, III. IV. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 



BEAUDOIN. DORIS CLAIRE 
Business Machines Course 
Sincere at all times, with an 
even disposition and a pleasant 
smile, Dot wants to take a trip 
with Helene to California. Danc- 
ing at "Tote", horseback riding, 
and making friends easily rate 
high with our Doris She is scorn- 
ful of chocolate ice cream and 
sophomore prejudice toward the 
seniors 

Dramatic Club IV. 
Advertising Staff of Mirror IV. 
Football Usher II, III. IV. 
Class Day Usher III 



BELL. JAMES LEHMAN, JR. 

Technical Course 

Our future engineer, Jimmy, 
likes hockey, football, physics, 
basketball, poker, ping-pong, pool 
and women German, baseball. 
Chester's handshake, ties, English. 
Assembly and the draft board def- 
initely disturb him 

Hockey II. III. IV 

Football III. IV 

President IV-B Sports Club. 






BENINATI, MARY PATRICIA 

Accounting Course 

"Tina" hopes to become a great 
success in business. Listening to 
the radio, going to Natick with 
T. C, and seeing the movies at 
least twice a week are her chief 
interests. Putting up her hair and 
washing dishes are her dislikes. 

Honor Roll II. 



BERRY RICHARD GAYNOR 

Technical Course 

Dick wants to make his living 
in the U. S. Maritime Service 
where there won't l»e any "Auf- 
gabe" to study or stiff collar 
shirts to wear. 

Basketball III. 



BORGER, EDWIN LEONARD 

Accounting Course 

"Jack" would like to work in a 
big airport out West or to travel 
around the world. He is always 
on time and dislikes being without 
money and waiting for people. 

Basketball III, IV. 

Honor Roll II, IV. 



BRYSON, PHYLLIS MARION 

Practical Arts Course 

"Poggie", the tall brown-eyed 
girl whose only desire is to eat, 
sleep, and be happy, likes to take 
her time, but this is impossible 
while trying to keep Drury out of 
trouble. Phyll says her chief dis- 
likes are men and homework ■ — 
we only believe the latter. A good 
sport and a likable person, Phyll 
will always have many friends. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 

Basketball III, IV. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Volley Ball III, IV. 

CANNISTRARO, JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Joe Can's destination is the Army 
and his ability to get along with 
people will make him a good 
soldier. Good-nature — always be- 
ing on time, paying debts, and 
lending money to D. G. are his 
chief virtues. He dislikes conceit- 
ed girls, standing in the cafeteria 
line, homework, and dull-colored 
neckties. Good luck to you in your 
Army career, Joe! 



BERRY, PAULINE FRANCES 

Stenographic Course 

Little "Miss Efficiency" plans to 
become a model secretary. We 
know it won't be hard for her as 
she is very good-natured and easy 
to get along with, as well as be- 
ing one of our constant honor roll 
pupils. Polly dislikes conceited 
people and glamour girls. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



BIGHAM, BARBARA FERELYN 

Practical Arts Course 

Barbie, our popular senior, is 
both pretty and talented. Her sin- 
cerity and knack for making 
friends are two of her best virtues. 
She likes to dance and enjoys near- 
ly all outdoor sports. Next year 
she will attend Colby Junior Col- 
lege, where she will major in 
music. From what we have seen 
of Barbara's ability in the past we 
feel confident that her rurure will 
be one of success. 

Football Usher IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Graduation Usher III. 

Jr. Prom Committee III. 

Dramatic Club Secretary III. 

Dramatic Club Committee IV. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Led Music in Assembly IV. 

Honor Roll III. 



BORGER, HELENE MARIE 

Business Machines Course 

"California, here I come," you'll 
hear Helene say when Alan Ladd 
is mentioned. Sorry fellows, but 
he's her ideal. Her promptness 
and plans for excitement with El 
and Alice make Helene our typical 
high school girl. Short fellows, 
fellows that don't dance, and peo- 
ple with talent who don't capita- 
lize on their ability make her want 
to tear her hair out at times. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Mirror Room Agent III, IV. 

Senior Nominating Committee IV. 

Parent-Teachers' Night Usher III. 

Honor Roll II. 



CALLAHAN, THOMAS PATRICK 
Business Machines Course 
Cal's ambition is to join the U 
S. Marine Corps and be its young 
est general. His pleasing sianner 
and smile have made him many 
friends. He hates women, but 
doesn't look that way to us. H 
vocabulary is made up of "what 
and "huh '. 

Basketball II, III. 



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CAPLAN, PHYLLIS SARA 

Business Machines Course 

When you see a girl with clothe* 

and a figure like a Powers mode' 

it's Phil. She detests waking 

in the morning at 7:30 and most 

all showers given on the last bel 

Next year she wants to attend M 

Ida Junior College. She enjoy 

collecting popular records and a 

tending D. D. T. meetings. 

Advertising Staff IV. 






CARDILLO, AMELIA 

College Course 

Milly, the vitamin kid, loves 
working at "Dandy", dancing, 
sports, Mr. You-know-who's apples, 
and people. Her virtue is her 
easy-going nature; her dislikes — 
she hasn't found any yet! Sep- 
tember 1946 will find her at 
Forsythe Dental School studying to 
be a dental hygienist. 

Basketball I, II, III, IV. 

Bowling I, II, III. IV. 

Volleyball I, II, III, IV. 

Baseball I, II, III, IV. 

Literary Staff II. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Co-Business Manager IV. 

Advertising Staff III. 

Dramatic Club 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Girls' Chorus III. IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

CARTER, ANN PATRICIA 

Accounting Course 

Annie hopes to succeed in bus- 
iness. Blue eyes and Sunday 
nights with C. E. are tops with 
her. She dislikes parsnips, hay 
fever, and people who are always 
on time. 

Parent-Teacher Usher III. 



CHACE, HELEN L. 

Stenographic Course 

"Be right back" says Helen as 
she spies "R. M." waiting outside 
1C9 Her favorite pastime is danc- 
ing to the music of "I Dream of 
You" the "you" being Ray. This 
modest little miss just wants to be 
happy and successful always and 
with her cheerful v/ays, we are 
sure she will be. 

Dramatic Club III 

Literary Staff Mirror IV. 

Honor Roll III, IV. 



CINCOTTA, IOSEPH R. 
Eusiness Machines Course 
Joe v/ants to be a success in life. 
He dislikes people who cannot car- 
ry on conversation and seeing 
high school teams lose to Newton. 
He can always be counted on to 
root for school teams and to read 
good books. 



COLLINS. PHILIP WILLIAM 

Practical Arts Course 

Phil has been studying Radio 
Engineering and intends to enter 
Northeastern when he gradu l 
His chief virtues are lending Joe 
lunch money and being patient in 
the cafeteria line He dislikes Joe's 
Ford and girls who can't dance 
Phil is full of fun and will make 
friends wherever he goes 



CARR, MILDRED ETHEL 
Business Machines Course 
Millie, whose ambition is to be 
a secretary, enjoys dancing, music, 
and bowling She dislikes home- 
work and the snapping of gum. 
She has a very pleasing person- 
ality and gets along with almost 
everyone. 

Diamatic Club IV. 
Bowling IV. 
Football Usher IV. 



CARUSO, SANTA BARBARA 
Business Machines Course 
This quiet little damsel hopes to 
tiavel to Europe. Good luck, 
Sandy". Lending a helping hand 
to those in need is her chief high 
spot. Bowling, Swimming, horse- 
back riding, and skating take up 
most of her spare time. Lazv, 
temperrnental, and unsocial people 
just dent fit into her life. 



CHAMPAGNE, MARGARET P. 

College Course 

Champei's ambition is to be a 
buyer ior some very "chic" shop. 
Quietness and keeping peace be- 
tween Joan and "Texas" are her 
chief virtues. This "gal" has a 
maa mania for Platonic friendships, 
lecuiving mail, and going out with 
B. D. She dislikes Gabriel Heater, 
Mr. Anthony, and lateness on 
dates. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Pennant Club IV. 

Graduation Usher III. 



COLLINS, LOUISE ANN 
College Course 

Glamourous Louise plans to be 
a laboratory technician She likes 
chemistry, and double dating with 
June. Getting up in the morning 
and waiting for June make her 
gnash her teeth. She's always 
"in the know" and is the whiz of 
the French class, 

Sophomore Social Committee II. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Bowling I, II 

Dramatic Club Plays IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, IV. 



COLLURA. SARAH ROSE 
Business Machines Course 
"Sally" hopes someday to attend 
the Boston Conservatory of Music. 
Dancing at Totem Pole, Mr. 
Hodge's apples, and bowling on 
Thursday night are tops with her 
waiting for Caroline and conceited 
men are her chief dislikes We 
sincerely wish you success in your 
future career. 
Advertising Staff of Mirror II. 
Dramatic Club IV. 
Girls Club IV. 
Class Day Usher III 





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CONNOLLY, JOHN FRANCIS, JR. 

Business Machines Course 

Jonnnie, or J. C, wants very- 
much to become the world's most 
publicized sports-writer so that he 
can retire when he's twenty-eight 
end then go to all the ball games. 
He dislikes waiting for people who 
are late. 

Advertising Staff of Mirror II. 

North Junior Alumni Comm. III. 

Honor Roll II. 



RUTH CORCORAN 



COVILLE, JOHN W., JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Johnny is always on time and 
enjoys sports and sailing. He tells 
us that ne has quite a time keep- 
ing the Chevrolet running, al- 
though the "limousine" seems to 
keep together in those mad dashes 
across town. He dislikes unrea- 
sonable teachers, Lenny's jokes, 
art periods, and warm water at 
the bubblers. John wants to enter 
mechanics or farming. 

Hockey III, IV. 



CREVOSHAY, ETTA V. 

College Course 

Crev's ambition is to go where 
all good people go and no doubt 
she will get there and drive the 
angels mad. Her chief virtues are 
friendliness and being frank. She 
dislikes people who complain and 
are conceited but likes potato chips 
and good sports. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Pennant Club IV. 

D. V.'s member IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Honor Roll III, IV. 



DACEY, JUNE BARBARA 

Junie plans to go to college. She 
and Louise are known as the "Si- 
amese Twins." She likes dancing 
at "Tote" and pretty clothes. 
Tune's friendly smile and wonder- 
ful personality will win her many 
friends. 

Bowling Team IV. 

Sophomore Social Committee II. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

W. H. S. Orchestra III. IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



CONWAY, LORRAYNE MAE 

Stenographic Course 

Lorry is our contribution to the 
Powers' Agency, and we know that 
her promptness and sense of hu- 
mour will aid in her career. People 
who are conceited or who are al- 
ways late are off her list. 



CORKUM, HARVARD RUSSELL 

Accounting Course 

Harvey's destination is the army 
in June. He likes to be on time 
for lunch and dislikes teacher: 
who keep him after the lunch bel 
rings. 



CRANE, LORRAINE SHIRLEY 
Dusiness Machines Course 
"Rainbow" dislikes waiting foi 
buses and people who don't keep 
appointments, but she likes danc 
ing and the movies. Lorraine anc 
"Bunny" intend to travel to Floridc 
if Lorraine doesn't settle dowi 
with P. A. first. She attendee 
Huntington Junior High, Brockton 
in 1941-42. 

Year Book Write-Ups IV. 
Sophomore Social Committee II. 
Junior Nominating Committee III 
Football Usher II, III, IV. 



CRONIN, FRANCES VIRGINIA 

Practical Arts Course 

"Don't let it bother you" i 
bound to be heard when Fran i 
around. Her cheerful personalit- 
and flashing smile will certainl; 
make her a success as an artist 
Frannie dislikes conceited peopl* 
and math, while singing, drawing 
swimming, men, and Bing Crosb' 
stand on her Hit Parade of fa 
vorites. 

Soph. Social Committee II. 

Red Cross Representative II. 

Junior Nominating Committee III 

Dramatic Club II. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

DAVINI, JAMES DAVID, JR. 

College Course 

Look behind that wide grim anc 
ycu'll find "Crisco," whose pe 
gripes are women drivers am 
teachers' pets. Jimmy is slatec 
for the Mass. School of Art when 
he will study for his chief ambi 
tion — illustrating "Esquire." H< 
stubbornly proclaims his virtues ti 
be honestv, in spite of protest. 

Art Staff, Mirror III. 

Honor Roll III. 



DAVISSON, ROBERT HENRY 

Practical Arts Course 

Some branch of the service is 
go.ng to get this handsome, well- 
dressed young man whom every- 
body knows and likes. Studious, 
fnendly, and straightforward. Bob 
is sure to be a success in life. As 
president of the "Big Four", one 
of his duties was getting lunches 
for the other three He likes all 
kinds of sports but dislikes doing 
homework and being late for class 
with "Lou" ("Bob and Lou" — the 
inseparables.) Best wishes to a 
grand fellow. 

Honor Roll II. 

Junior Porm Committee III. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 



DORIS LOUISE DEMPSEY 



DI PRONIO, CHESTER A. 

Technical Course 

Northeastern will soon be mak- 
ing an engineer out of Chet, who 
claims he has no special virtues. 
Doing German homework and 
Bell's knowledge of physics annoy 
him. 

President, IV-B Buddies Club. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 



DORVAL. MARIE THERESA 

Stenographic Course 

Demure and dimpled Marie plans 
to travel and someday own her 
own "convertible." Dorv has been 
kept busy participating in all 
sports and as a result is one of 
our leading figures in athletics 
With her good-nature, we are sure 
she will succeed in anything she 
undertakes. 

Basketball II, III, IV. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Volley Ball II, III, IV. 

Archery II, III, IV 

Baseball II, III, IV. 

Badminton II, III. 

Field Hockey IV 

Co-sports Editor IV. 

Cheerleader IV 

Dramatic Club IV. 



DOWCETT. PHYLLIS MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"When Irish eyes are smilina." 
you know it must be Phil, whose 
immediate destination is Colby 
Junior College where she will 
study to be a medical secretary 
Aftp' Colby, she intends to work 
hard at her career, and we know 
she will be a success 

Mirror Advertising Staff IV. 



DEARBORN, GERALD FOREST 

Special Course 

That quietly dozing fellow in 
Room 215 is probably Jerry, whose 
worst enemy is manual labor. His 
cnief recreations are sports and 
listening ^ to the endless "9:20 
Club." He hates to wear a tie. 
3ut Jerry, nevertheless, is a well- 
liked and popular boy who will 
either go into the Marines or to 
Purdue University after graduation. 

Basketball II. 

Sophomore Social Comm. II. 

Red Cross Representative III. 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Mirror Staff II, III, IV. 

Cafeteria Staff III, IV. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Honor Roll II. 

DEVEAUX, EILEEN CATHRINE 

Practical Arts Course 

Eileen is the girl whose brown 
eyes and long lashes are the envy 
of her many friends. Her worst 
weakness is sleeping far into the 
morning. Eileen has not yet de- 
cided on her plans for the future, 
but her ability to get along with 
others should be of great value in 
whatever she undertakes. 

Basketball III, IV. 

Volley Ball III. 



DOLAN, GEORGE THOMAS, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Lover-boy" wants to be a 
newspaper reporter. This young 
fellow with personality plus says 
his best virtues are always ar- 
riving just before the bell, being 
loyal, always a gentleman, and a 
great lover besides keeping J. F. 
in money. He dislikes second 
lunch, work, and small good look- 
ing girls who are conceited 

Soph. Nominating Committee II. 



ELAINE DOYLE 



DRURY, CARLENE 

Practical Arts Course 

Carlene is the winsome and wit- 
ty senior of 114 Her patience 
comes in very handy while she is 
waiting for Phyl. Although she 
enjoys all sports, she likes swim- 
ming best Carlene hopes some 
day to become a good nurse, and 
we all feel certain that she will. 

Dramatic Club II 

Baseball I, II. IV 

Field Hockey IV 

Basketball It 

Badminton I 

Cafeteria IV. 






DUDDY, MARY JANET 

Stenographic Course 

Jan, that chic little number in 
109, would like to gain distinction 
as a certified public accountant. 
She particularly likes to sing, and 
we shall always be grateful to her 
for the many times that she has 
lifted cur spirits with her delight- 
fully alluring voice. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



DUGAN, RICHARD HOWARD 

Business Machines Course 

If you see a tall lanky senior 
walking down the corridor with a 
t-etrie sophomore, you will know 
it's Dick. He would like to make 
a living playing hockey. He dis- 
likes algebra tests, unsociable 
girls, and meeting girls' parents. 

Hockey II, III, IV. 

Bay State All Stars IV. 

Football IV. 

Sophomore and Senior Dance 
Committee IV. 

Mirror Writeups IV. 



DWYER, JOHN VINCENT 

Practical Arts Course 

Jack enjoys all sports, but es- 
pecially skiing and hunting. The 
fact that this expert on guns was 
Treasurer of the "Big Four" prob- 
cbly explains how he kept the job. 
He dislikes lending money to Lou 
and being iate for school. Every- 
one knows John by his snappy ap- 
pearance and faultless attire. We 
have no doubt but that someday 
he will be either U. S. Game War- 
den or a $50,000-per-year super- 
clothing salesman. 



ENMAN, SHIRLEY ARLENE 

( ollege Course 

Shirley, called "Amber" by her 
friends, and we use the term 
loosely, likes writing letters, 
movies, and boys in general. She's 
headed for Chandler Secretarial 
bcnool, wnere we hope she won't 
meet any "haters" or people who 
are always late, for she can't 
stand them. 

Pennant Club IV 

Dramatic Club III. 

Glee Club II. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



FAMOSI, REYNOLD ARTHUR 
Business Machines Course 
Rennie's destination is North- 
eastern or the Navy. He likes 
skiing, horseback riding, and ten- 
nis, while he dislikes keeping 
people waiting and filing. 
Mirror Advertising Staff IV. 



DUDEK, CAROLINE MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

Our "cute," dark-eyed Can 
who came from Lawrence, will t 
ways be a success as a privc 
secretary. She never fails to 1 
on time, and we've yet to catch 
slip of that excellent memory. V 
know all her friends will join 
in wishing her the best, always 

Honor Roll III. 

Red Cross Representative IV. 



DUPLISEA, ALAN RAYMOND 

Practical Arts Course 

Our band will not seem comple 
without Alan and his "Licori 
stick". His clarinet playing h 
b«en a definite asset. "Al" e 
joys vacations and all sports, chit 
ly baseball. He dislikes wint 
(except for ice-skating), oystei 
and driving in traffic. He hi 
been one of the high school's mc 
active members. This popular It 
intends to join the navy and th' 
enter college, where his pleasa 
manner will surely gain him mai 
friends. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 

Dramatic Club II. 

Vice President Dramatic Club 1 

Orchestra III. 

Junior Nominating Committee 

EDMUNDS, EVELYN THERESA 
Business Machines Course 
The girl who will greet you wi 
"Good Afternoon" when you ent 
"The Golden Bell" just wants 
type for the future. She is prom 
and dependable. Waiting, writii 
letters, conceited people, loi 
people, and homework make h 
shrink down to nothing. Goc 
luck in your singing carer. 



ELLIS, ELIZABETH 

College Course 

Elizabeth, quiet and cooperativ 
plans to attend a junior collec 
next year. Her nickname, "Lizzie 
is her pet peeve. She likes spoi 
frcm both the participator ai 
spectator angle, psychologic 
movies, and semi-classical music 

Honor Roll III. 

Basketball I, IV. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 



FANARA, SANTINA 

College Course 

"Sandy'"s destination is 
Newton-Wellesley Hospital, whe 
she hopes to make people fore 
their troubles with her frienc 
smile. Her chief virtue is lovi 
life, and she is always ready 
a debate in English or Deutsc 
Eating with chopsticks is a f 
which she hopes to accomplish 
the near future. 

Dramatic Club I, II. 

Graduation Usher III. 



FARRELL, JAMES E. 

Practical Arts Course 

Jimmy, Grover Cronin's "super 
salesman", is a very well-liked 
boy who really makes a big hit 
with all the girls. G. D., T. N., 
and Jim can always be seen chum- 
ming together or making it hot for 
some teacher. He hopes to go into 
aviation after graduation. 



FISHER. ESTHER OLIVE 
Business Machines Course 
"Flip" s ambition is to travel 
and to make fudge (when there is 
enough sugar). She is cheerful 
and likes letter writing, all sports, 
and good music. Homework, ten- 
minute tests, and snow in March 
annoy her. 

Football Usher II, III, IV. 



FLANNERY, DOROTHY JOANNE 

Stenographic Course 

Quiet and starry-eyed, Joanne 
a ms to become a fashion de- 
signer. If she does as well in her 
ambition as she has done in her 
studies, we know she'll be a suc- 
cess Her chief dislikes are people 
who put on haughty airs. 

Honor Roll II. Ill, IV. 



FOSTER. WILLIAM ALFRED 

Accounting Course 

Willie wants to go to Boston 
Lniversity and then be a public 
accountant He likes being on 
time and doing homework, but he 
dislikes having homework on 
weekends 

Cafeteria Worker IV. 

Honor Roll I, II. IV. 



FRARY. WILLIAM FREDERICK 

Practical Arts Course 

Bill is persistent, argumentative, 
ambitious, outspoken, and very 
athletic As one of the main stays 
of Waltham's football team he has 
made a good name for himself. 
He likes swimming, and intends to 
be a swimming instructor in Cali- 
fornia (where it n»v*r rains— well 
almost never). His chief virtues 
are arriving at school on time, 
getting T K in early, procuring 
lunches for the Big Five and then 
bringing the trays back "Willie" 
dislikes getting up and perhaps 
that's because he also dislikes go- 
ing to bed We wish Bill every 
success 

Football II, III. IV 

Mirror Room Agent II 

Mirror Advertising Staff III 



FELT, NORMAN MURRAY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Lucky "s ambition is to be a 
rancn owner and with his ability 
tc make friends, we know he will 
be a success in anytning he un- 
certakes. Keeping A. L. supplied 
with money and being quiet stand 
out as his chief virtues; baby-taii 
end homework are his dislikes. 
We'll be seeing you out in Texas, 
Norman! 



FLAGG, JANE REBECCA 

College Course 

Mountain climbing, bicycling, 
ond all types of music are sure to 
rain praise from Jane, whose am- 
bition is to go to college and to 
become a social worker. Jane's: 
favorite expression is "Oh, golly" 
which she uses throughout rrench 
classes. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

Co-Editor of the Notes. 

Member Dramatic Club II, III, TV. 

Literary Staff of Mirror I, II, III. 

Music Editor of Mirror IV. 

Red Cross room-agent IV. 

President Girls' Club IV. 

Representative ot F. H. A. IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

FLANNERY, ROBERT A. 

Special Course 

Bcb, otherwise known as 
"Rocco," has hopes of being an 
engineer. After being discharged 
from the Navy, he came back to 
school to get his diploma. He 
likes "Cokes," women, and songs. 
He car. be heard saying, "What 
can you do?" to all people at all 
times. Good luck, Bob! I I ! 



FRANCHINA, PAULA ANN 

College Course 

Frankie's destination is Radclifie; 
her ambition is to pay back the 
money borrowed from D A G. 
Her worst fault is laziness and her 
complete oblivion when walking on 
the street Someday she wont 
sidestep that open manhole Sho 
dislikes math, homework, "goody- 
goodies", and mushrooms. 

Archery II 

Baseball I 

Basketball I. 

Editorial Staff Mirror IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



FREEMAN. MARGARET MARY 

Stenographic Course 

It takes all kinds of people to 
make up the world and Pegay 
just seems to like them all Per- 
haps that is why she is so popu- 
lar Her chief dislike is waiting 
and her ambition is to become 
private secretary to "A R " May 
you be successful 




Pi 






FRIZZELL, MARGARET JEAN 

College Course 

Patient, conscientious, and am'.- 
able; that's Peggy. She plans to 
go to Forsythe Dental School and 
become a dental hygienist. People 
v. 1 ho nag and girls without a sense 
of humor annoy Peg. Her cheer- 
ful disposition and quiet nature 
will get her far. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Football Usher IV. 

Graduation Day Usher III. 

Honor Roll IV. 



GALLITANO, CATHERINE 

College Course 

"Kay" likes horseback riding, 
Gregory Peck, and being squired 
about by H. A. W. People who 
are too normal, speed limits, and 
crowds annoy her. Her ambition 
is to work v/itK alcoholics, para- 
noids and, (pardon us while we 
swallow our gum,) psychoneuro- 
tics; her destination is Simmons. 

Dramatic Club II. 

Basketball I. 

Volley Ball II. 

Girls' Chours II, III, IV. 

Pennant Club IV. 



GASTONGUAY. LORRAINE M. 

Stenographic Course 

Lorraine would like to be suc- 
cessful in a government position. 
Because she is always on time and 
right to the point, we know she 
v/ill be a valuable asset to our 
government. Lorraine dislikes slow 
people, and she particularly likes 
to get Mr. Hood's lunch. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



GIBBS, DONALD 

Practical Arts Course 

Gibby's ambition is to be coach 
of the "Lakeview High School" 
football team, and with his knowl- 
edge of football and standards of 
fair play we know he will ful- 
fill his ambition. Don is very ath- 
letic and enjoys all sports, espec- 
ially football. Good luck to you, 
Don, and keep up the good work! 

Football IV. 



GILLIS, JOHN WILLIAM 

Technical Course 

Little John plans to study struct- 
ual design at the Massachusetts 
School of Art if the Army doesn't 
catch him first. Buying Hoodsies 
for Chet is his daily good deed, 
while Chefs handshake and the 
Draft Board's looming threat are 
his chief dislikes. 

Editor-in-chief of IV-B's Crib- 
Sheet Press. 



FRULLO, PHYLLIS MARIE 
business Machines Course 
Pnil, who always has a new 
joke nandy warns to become a 
successful secretary. Music, danc- 
ing, going to the movies with 
D. F., ana Alan Ladd rate high in 
her mind. Snapping gum and 
people who are not on time anger 
iier. 



GARDNER, MARJORIE CAROLINL 

bienographic Course 

You can t miss her in the corri- 
dors of W. H. S. for, with the 
warmth of her cheery smile and 
sparkling eyes, Margie will melt 
her way into your heart. As a 
proficient member of the W. H. S. 
girls' quintet, she has exhibited 
her skill in athletics. We'll always 
remember a wonderful classmate. 

basketball II, III, IV. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 

cowling II, III, IV. 

Archery II, III. 

Volley Ball II, III, IV. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Class Prophet IV. 

badminton III. 

Sports Co-editor of Mirror IV. 

Art Staff of Mirror IV, 

Class Day Usher III. 
, Sophomore Social Committee II. 

Senior Nominating Committee IV. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Pennant Club III. 

Honor Roll II, III. 

GEOFFRION, JULIA THERESA 

Stenographic Course 

Julie wants to be successful. 
Knowing her adorable disposition 
and charming blush, we know that 
she could never be anything else. 
We are all proud to have her as a 
member of the class of '46. 

Junior Nominating Committee III. 

Member of S. D. S. Club IV. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



GILES, DOROTHY PRISCILLA 

Practical Arts Course 

Everyone who knows this pleas- 
ant-mannered girl will agree that 
her best virtue is being quiet. 
Dotty plans to go to the Wilson 
School for Medical and X-Ray 
Technicians. We all wish you 
luck, Dotty, for we know you will 
be a success in whatever you at- 
tempt. 

Basketball IV. 

Volley Ball IV. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Archery IV. 



GOODRIDGE, DOROTHY ANN 

College Course 

To rip up an algebra book, page 
by page, is Dot's ambition which 
is shared by eight other sufferers 
of Algebra II. Dot cordially dis- 
likes white sauce and bread 
crumbs, and being called "Dottv 
Ann"; and her virtue, or is it 
fault, is loaning Frankie money. 

Volley Ball I. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



GORDON, GEORGE LAMPEN 

Accounting Course 

"Stretch" wants to start a busi- 
ness with Bob Davisson, who is 
his partner in crime. He hates 
"society" girls and writing letters. 



GRANT, WARREN F. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Zoote" is fond of all sports, es- 
pecially hockey, football, and box- 
ing. He likes chumming around 
with the home fellows, listening to 
songs by Bing or Nelson Eddy, 
taking part in eraser fights, and 
going to Canada in the summer. 
Lack of sleep, work, assemblies, 
unreasonable teachers, homework, 
and "Lenny's" jokes irritate him. 
He is friendly, a ready talker, in- 
telligent, and one of the best liked 
fellows in the class. He hopes to 
attend college after serving in the 
Navy. 



GREENE, LEON EVERETT 

College Course 

Greenie prides himself on that 
perfect deadpan he assumes when 
his brain has ceased functioning 
in French and German. He loves 
to laugh at Power and Keyes, es- 
pecially the latter in 113. Physics 
tests and a 1-A rating give him 
insomnia. If he can elude the 
draft board he will attend a mid- 
western journalism school. 

Ed.tor-in-chief of Mirror IV. 

Class Historian IV. 

Honor Roll IV. 



GUBA, ANNE LACKENS 

College Course 

"Stacy" plans to be engaged in 
biological work and likes nature- 
study immensely. She enjoys mu- 
sic and plays the clarinet well, 
but egotistical people "irritate" 
Thoughtful and considerate. 



her 

she is faithful to responsibility 
a sincere student and friend 

Secretary-Treasurer of the Fresh- 
man Class I. 

Honor Roll I, II. Ill, IV. 

Basketball I. 

Sophomce Social Committee II 

Diamatic Club III. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 

HAGAR. BRUCE A 

Accounting Course 

Hagar's ambition is to own a 
fleet of trucks and run a success- 
ful trucking business His best 
virtue is being honest and his 
chief dislikes are typewriting and 
hard work. 



GRACEFFA, STELLA MADELAINE 
Business Machines Course 
"Butch" is frequently seen rush- 
ing around asking, "Are you go- 
ing dancing tonight?" She es- 
pecially likes the "Tote' with J 
De S. and hopes someday to travel 
to Florida with Kay. She dislikes 
fellows who can't dance and wait- 
ing for Kay. Her pleasing person- 
ality and good nature will carry 
her far. 

Class Day Usher III. 
Football Usher IV. 



GRAY, FLORA ELLEN 

Stenographic Course 

Our tall, willowy Flora expects 
to enter the business world as a 
private secretary. She can always 
be found, both during class and 
after, chatting with the other two 
members of her popular "three- 
some " We'll never forget how 
Flora enlivened the little get-to- 
gethers. 

Advertising Staff of Mirror III, IV. 

Honor Roll II. 



GRIFF, HARRIS MORTON 

Accounting Course 

Morty wants to go to B. U., and 
become an accountant. He dislikes 
getting Bartlett's and Haynes's 
lunch and doing homework. 

Honor Roll I, II. Ill, IV. 



Eres- 
atin 



HAAG, RUTH MARIAN 

College Course 

Come September and lucky Bos- 
ton University will have "Foofie" 
whose ambition is to learn to fly. 
Her pet peeves are bleached 
blondes and Friday chemistry tests. 
Marines, letters from Guam, Perry 
Como, and eating "Amber's" 
lunch, keep her happy. At 
ent her job is that 50-50 
translation deal with Fini. 

Dramatic Club II, III. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Pennant Club IV 

Graduation Usher III 

Literary Staff Mirror III, IV. 

Girls' Chorus II, IV. 

North Junior Alumni Dance Com- 
mittee I 

Honor Roll I. 



HALL, GERTRUDE ANNA 

Practical Arts Course 

Gert promises to be the best 
hairdresser the world has eve: 
known People who are always 
late are of no use to this an'. 
\ hose virtue is being on time Her 
e of humor has gained her 
many friends She dislikes loud 
people. 






HAM, RICHARD WARREN 
Business Machines Course 
Dick's ambition is to attend 
Northeastern and play hockey. He 
likes to be on time and especially 
to be alert in math and physics 
classes. He dislikes waiting tor 
M. O., homework, women drivers, 
and Friday and Saturday nights. 
Hockey II, III, IV. 
Football IV. 

Bay State All Stars IV. 
Class Auditor III. 



DOROTHY HAND 



HARNETT, ELIZABETH MARIE 

College Course 

Lt,,y aaimis she doesn't like 
"B. M. F.'s" or people who can t 
laugn, since sne, herselt, enjoys 
luuymng along with movies, horse- 
back riding, "Tote", and getting 
letters. She intends to study music 
at a conservatory, but later she 
wants to live out West. Ride 'em. 
Cowboy! 

Orchestra I, II, III, IV. 

Graduation Usher III. 

basketball I, II. 

Senior Nominating Comm. IV. 

Girls' Chorus II. 

Baseball I. 

Honor Roll I, II. 

HAYES, THERESA FRANCES 

Stenographic Course 

"Theresa Hayes Swims the Eng- 
lish Channel!" When you see this 
headline sometime in the future, 
you will know Tre has reached her 
destination. She has a good senss 
of humor and is always ready to 
■ ave a good time. Room 109 cer- 
tainly would have been dreary 
without her wit and merriment. 

Baseball II, III. 

Mirror Staff Secretary IV. 

Badminton II, III. 

Mirror Representative III, IV. 

HAYNES, MARJORIE ELEANOR 

Practical Arts Course 

"What's your troubles?" is Mar- 
gie's favorite expression when she 
meets you. She hopes to travel 
and sing with an orchestra. Mar- 
gie's chief virtues are being good- 
natured, lending money, and see- 
ing a joke. She dislikes homework, 
conceited people, and waiting for 
mail; but likes Frank Sinatra, go- 
ing out with Esther, and getting 
mail from a certain Coast Guard. 

Orchestra I. 

Girls' Club IV. 



HAMILTON, BRUCE CONRAD 
Business Machines Course 
Bruce's ambition is to work for 

the telephone company or to join 

the Navy. He likes loud colors, 

dressing "sharp", and sports. 

Bruce hates lending money to T. 

C. and Rennie, and people that 

are always late. 

Mirror Room Agent II. 



HANSEN, DAVID A., JR. .". , 

Technical Course 

Dave says that his ambition is to 
go to Tech, but his destination is 
Northeastern. He claims his chief 
virtue is always studying his Ger- 
man "Aufgabe" so that he can 
be as good as Bill Power. "Lefty" 
dislikes being overweight, dra't 
bait, and people (PO and SW) 
who over use the pay station tel- 
ephone ai Rogers'. 

IV-B's President of the Home- 
work Check. 

Golf IV. 



HARRIS, ESTHER MARY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ma" wishes she had a lot of 
money so she could go traveling. 
Her chief virtue is being on time. 
She likes the Hit Parade, talking 
with Margie on the telephone, the 
Navy, and Peter. She dislikes 
waiting for people and getting up 
early on Saturday mornings. 

Girls' Club IV. 



HAYNES, GEORGE IRVING 

Accounting Course 

Haynesie jniends to go to Boston 
University and then into business 
for himself. His special attraction 
seems to be a little piano player — 
and we don't mean Iturbi. Guess 
who? ? 

Hockey II, III, IV. 

Football IV. 

Class Vice-President II. 

Auditor IV. 

Bay State All Stars IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



HENDSBEE, ALICE CATHERINE 
Business Machines Course 
Alice's ambition is to be a sec- 
retary. She is loyal to her friends 
and enjoys popular music and 
movies, but dislikes catty and con- 
ceited people. She attended St. 
Anne's School, Arlington, Massa-. 
chusetts, in September, 1941, be- 
fore coming to Waltham High. 



HODGES, VERNE H. 

Most of us are not acquainted 
with former Flight Officer Hodges, 
ne ennsted in the Air Corps in 
May, 1943, during his Senior year 
and he has been so busy winning 
a war that not until now has he 
completed his graduation require- 
ments at Syracuse University. 
Verne plans to attend Dartmouth 
next year. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 

Hockey IV. 



HOMER, MARY LOUISE 

Practical Arts Course 

Mary Lou has a happy nature. 
She tikes to swim and enjoys mu- 
sic as a hobby. Next year she is 
going to a school of designing and 
hopes some day to have her own 
shop in New York. Such a talent- 
ed girl should do well in this 
work; her friendliness will help her 
a long way, too. 

W. H. S. Orchestra II, III, IV. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 



HORNE, JOAN ELIZABETH 

Practical Arts Course 

Joanie is one of the seniors of 
IK whose obliging and cooperative 
nature is definitely a virtue. She 
likes swimming, camping, and 
dancing. On Saturdays she at- 
tends the New England School of 
Art. and hopes to continue there 
after graduation. Her greatest de- 
sire is to "Globe Trot." 

Basketball IV. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Volley Ball IV. 

Badminton IV. 

Junior Prom Committee III 

Red Cross Representative IV. 

HORTON, EDITH ELIZABETH 
Business Machines Course 
Waltham High's own blond with 
the blue eyes hopes to travel to 
Florida to keep "Rainbow" com- 
pany. Good luck to you both. 
"Bunny" thrives on clothes, going 
to the movies, swimming, and 
traveling. She is prompt herself, 
so tardiness on the part of a bus 
or a person just make living for 
Edith disgusting. 
Mirror Room Agent II 
Sophomore Social Committe II. 
Football Usher HI, IV. 

ISAACSON, RICHARD CARL 

Practical Arts Course 

Ike's ambition is to visit Cali- 
fornia This friendly senior claims 
his best virtue is being on time, 
which is quite a rare virtue among 
boys He likes blondes. Boogie 
Woogie. and ice cream, while his 
dislikes consist of Conceited girls, 
doing homework, and waiting in 
the cafeteria line Keep smiling, 
Dick. 



KOFFSES, GRACE ANNE 
Business Machines Course 
Anne hopes to become a secre- 
tary. She enjoys going down 
street on Saturday nights. We 
wonder why? ? ? She dislikes 
people who are late, conceited 
people, and being called "Annie". 
Bowling IV. 
Football Usher IV. 



HOOPER, BARBARA JUNE 

Stenographic Course 

Next year Barbara expects to 
show the girls at B. U. how to be- 
come a successful medical secre- 
tary. Who can blame her for en- 
joying vacations in Canada? Mr. 
Hood's portrayal of Lady Macbeth 
will also remain a source of en- 
joyment. 

Archery II. 

Badminton II. 

Bowling II. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Advertising Staif of Mirror III. 

Football Usher III. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



HORRIGAN, ELIZABETH LOUISE 

Practical Arts Course 

Whenever you hear "I'm just a 
smart kid" you can be sure Betty 
is around. This friendly girl who 
is always ready with a smile likes 
to make new friends. Betty dis- 
likes doing homework, but she 
likes to listen to Lux Radio Theater. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Graduation Usher III 

Football Usher I, II. 



HOSMER, RICHARD CLARKE 

College Course 

Graduation, vacations, German, 
and most sports are in high favcr 
with Dick, who plans to go to 
Tufts College if the Navy doesn't 
get him first Dick proves the 
statement "good things always 
come in small packages", as he 
is friendly, humorous, and full of 
fun 

Dramatic Club II. III. IV 

Senior Nominating Committee IV. 



JACOBS. CARL WINTHROP 

Practical Arts Course 

Because he likes bowling very 
much. Bumpy will probably end 
up a bowling alley manager He 
is cne ol the most cheerful mem- 
bers of our class, and enjoys all 
spcrts, but doesn't hke homework 
or unreasonable teachers If his 
hopes are realized, Carl will be 
veartng navy blue soon after 
giaduation 




v%fi 



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JOHNSON, MARGARET HELEN . 

College Course 

Johnie plans to attend Mass. 
School of Art. Truthfulness is one 
of her chief virtues. Always on 
the go, she enjoys skiing, skating, 
horseback riding, and trips with 
E. Z. Her chief dislikes are con- 
ceited and inquisitive people. 

Basketball III. 



JONES, AMY ELLEN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jonesie" plans to attend Fanny 
Farmers Scnool of Cooking, be- 
ing quiet and easy io get along 
with are I.e.' chiei virtues. Sne 
likes ti.e 9:zu Club, movies, choco- 
late trappes, bicycle riding, Lux. 
Radio Theater, and quiz programs, 
bne disiikes standing in the "caf" 
line. 



JUDKINS, WARREN DEXTER 

'technical Course 

rriendly and nelpful to his class- 
maies, "Babbit" is an outstanding 
sti.dent and science enthusiast. 
He is one of those rare individuals 
wro have no dislikes. Next year 
he plans to study at the Massachu- 
setts Scr.ool of Optometry. 

President of IV-B Science Cluo. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



KEFFE, DOROTHEA ETHEL 
Business Macnines Course 
Keefy likes working in a florist 
shop and Saturday nights on 
Moody Street. She hopes someday 
to be a hairdresser; determination 
and willingness to succeed will 
help her along. She dislikes loud 
people and reading. (Don't let a 
certain English teacher hear you.l 



KEITH, DONALD EDWARD 
Business Machines Course 
Keith is army-bound, but hopes 
to go to Northeastern and play 
hockey. He enjoys spending his 
time with L. L. and lending money 
to Smitty. He is always helping 
Dick with his math. He dislikes 
blondes, red heads, and doing 
homework. 

Hockey II, III, IV. 
Bay State All Stars IV. 
Baseball IV. 



JOHNSON. VIRGINIA ETHEL 

College Course 

Jini (where'd I put my crib 
sheet?) Johnson will, in the future 
make a success of herself as a 
commercial artist. Her likes are 
many; namely, silver, jewelry, 
peppermint patties, Ruthie, and 
Tote. Her own good nature foste:s 
her dislike of people who can'i 
take a joke. 

Dramatic Club I. 

Pennant Club IV. 

Girls' Chorus II. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Graduation Usher III. 

Advertising Staff Mirror III, IV. 

Assistant Art Editor IV. 



JONES, WALTER HERBERT 

Accounting Course 

"Hank" is the fellow who enjoys 
lending money to Dick and Hayne- 
sie, and annoying someone in 212. 
He hopes to make a living at Joe's, 
but hates to be reminded of the 
army. 

Junior Nominating Committee III, 

Football II, III, IV. 

Soph. Nominating Committee II. 



KANE, ANNE 

Practical Ans Course 

"Lootie" is the easy-going girl 
v.- hose chief ambition is to bask in 
the sun all year round in Cali- 
fornia. Although she dislikes be- 
ing hurried, she is the first one tc 
welcome a chance to go swim- 
ming, horseback riding, or skiing. 
"Lootie's" good disposition and 
sense of humor have been greatly 
appreciated by ail her classmates. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Band IV. 

Baseball IV. 

Basketball IV. 

Cafeteria IV. 

KFFFE, HELEN ELIZABETH 
Business Machines Course 
Helen's ambition is to become a 
successful office worker. Her neat 
and competent work will be 1 
great asset. Going to the movies 
and traveling abroad are two of 
her future interests. She dislikes 
people who are hard to get along 
with and conceited girls. 



KELLEY, ALICE E. 

business Machines Course 

With red hair, shapely figure, 
and a quick "Hi" for everyone, 
Alice goes running through the 
corridors so as not to be late for 
class. A word to the wise — Don't 
call her "Red" which she dislikes. 
Also waiting for "El" is disturb- 
ing to her. Owning a new con- 
vertible and obtaining a soft job 
is her ambition. 

Football Usher II, III, IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Mirror Write-up IV. 



KELLEY, DOROTHY GERTRUDE 

Accounting Course 

"Close up! You talk too much," 
sc>s i^ot »vnen sne get3 tired of 
hearing people talk. She likes be- 
ing with a certain fellow all the 
time, but onions and homework 
are out. 

Bowling II, III. 

Baseball III. 

Pennant Club IV. 



KELLY, WILLIAM EDWARD 

Accounting Course 

Kels ambition is to be a C. P. 
A. He can always be counted on 
;c be on time, but dislikes doing 
homework and sitting through math 
period. 

Honor Roll IV. 



KING, CLAIRE TERESA 
Business Machines Course 
Pimp," because 6he's small, 
wants to bo a dietitian; lots of Iuck 
t© her! Bike riding, hiking, and 
I leasing her customers at Kresges' 
she likes, but not homework and 
classes in Room ? ? ? 
Football Usher III, IV. 



LACAVA, LILLIAN GRACE 

Accounting Course 

Lil s ambition is to get a success- 
ful business position. Telling jokes 
during lunch periods, getting alonj 
with people and hearing Frank 
Sinatra rate first Going to the 
rimrist, homework, and Monday 
mornings rate last. Here's hoping 
you succeed. 



LA ROSSE. ARTHUR JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

"George's ambition is to be man- 
ager of a theatre and he is start- 
ma from the bottom up as an 
usher Ho dislikes homework, his- 
tory, cafeteria lines, gabby girlr, 
end report cards When walkir.T 
through the corridors, if you come 
upon a blonde senior with a mis- 
chievous twinkle in his eye, you 
can be sure it's Arthur! 



KELLEY, JACQUELINE ANNE 

Accounting Course 

Jackie loves fried clams, horse- 
back riding and swimming, bui 
when it comes to conceited people 
she turns her back on them, 
you hear, "What's for homework?" 
you know Jackie's around. 



KEYES, WALTER IRVING 

Technical Course 

"Iccy's" ambition is to go to 
Northeastern. He likes dancing at 
"Tote" with Jan, playing golf with 
Roy and Phil, basketball, and star- 
ing at "Mugger". However, ho 
dislikes gabby girls, homework, 
and borrowing money from Bell 
and Power. 

Basketball II, III, IV. 

President of the IV-B U. B. H. 
Fun Club. 

Chairman Junior Prom II. 

Chairman Sophomore Social II. 

Sophomore Auditor II. 

Athletic Association Student Rep- 
resentative IV. 

Cheerleader IV. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



KOULOPOULOS, BEATRICE J. 

College Course 

Petite and sweet is Bea, who is 
easy to get along with, loyal, and 
punctual. She likes sweets, draw- 
ing, and almost everything except 
hsn and new fancy toods. Bea s 
ambition is to major in art at B. U. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Pennant Club IV. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III. 

Badminton II. 



LANGILL, MARJORIE ANN 
Business Machines Course 
Marge likes dancing at the 
Tote" with a certain someone 
and the daily gatherings at Brig- 
ham's. She gets great pleasure 
out of teasing Helen about Art 
Conceited and stubborn men and 
people who are not on time are 
her chief dislikes. 



LAW, DAVID JAMES 

Technical Course 

Nicknamed "Theoretical" by his 
classmates. David's ambition is to 
ao to college He is a confirmed 
woman hater and seems to d; 
all teen-age girls especially His 
chief virtue is his sense of humor 
He likes playing pool and all typ< s 
of photography. Acting in the 
Dramatic Club plays occupies a 
great deal of his time 

Mirror Photographer III. IV. 

Dramatic Club III IV 

Honor Roll I. 






LUAVY, CHARLOTTE ANN 

^ouege coarse 

A member ol the famous "Ann" 
trio, oal s destination is Hadclilte 
and ner ambition is to get mar- 
lied, fatand by, Navy! bhe en- 
joys dancing at "Tote" and writ- 
i.ij ten page letters to tne U. S. 
rieet. fane doesn t like conceited 
men and people who are always 
late. 

Dramatic Club II, III, IV. 

Liierary Stall Mirror III. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Mirror Exchange Editor IV. 

Treasurer Pennant Club IV. 

Bowling II, III. 

Volleyball II. 

Archery II, III. 

Girls' Chorus IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



LEBLANC, LOUIS G., JR. 

Accounting Course 

"Bella" is destined to join the 
U. S. Navy and then the C. A. P. 
His chief virtues are lending money 
to the lunch-room gang and doing 
homework. Getting up in the 
morning and noisy girls he dis- 
likes.. 

Mirror Room Aaent I, II. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



LINDSTROM, ELAINE 

Stenographic Course 

"Elaine the fair, Elaine the lov- 
able." "Lindy", whose loyalty 
and sincerity have endeared her 
tc all who know her, wants only 
io make good at whatever sirs 
does. Music and waiting for the : 
Navy to wash ashore her seaman 
come first on her list, while first- 
period Gym classes are way down 
at the bottom. 

Advertising Staff Mirror III, IV. 

LOCKHART, DOROTHY AUGUSTA 

College Course 

Dee's destination is Boston Uni- 
versity; her ambition is to teacii 
English. Her virtues are sincerity, 
Ti.oa^ii'.fulness and cheerfulness, 
but she can't cope with sarcastic 
or cynical people. Not having the 
ca>" she wants also disturbs her. 
She likes dancing, fun at fellow- 
ship, and keeping up the morale 
of a certain someone in Alaska. 

Dramatic Club 1, II, III, IV. 

Bowlina I, II, III, IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Graduation Usher III. 

Girls' Chorus IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Red Cross Reoresentative III. IV. 

Class Poet IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

MACLEAN, HECTOR 

G-illeae Course 

"Hacker" proudly proclaims his 
virtures to be honesty and modes- 
tv — but we like him anyway.- 
Noisy girls, Dapper Dans, women 
drivers and French drive him crazv, 
but he does like .... he must 
like something! His destination is 
Ei-ston University, of which he'll 
probably become the Dean after 
several years. 

Baseball III, IV. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



LEBLANC, EDWARD JOSEPH 

Accounting Course 

Eddy is a quiet fellow from \17. 
He is interested in all sports, es- 
pecially football. He hates to typs, 
to stay alter school, to do home- 
work, and to hear noisy women. 
Eddy's ambition is to attend Bent- 
ley's and to get a good job. 



LEL1EVRE KATHLEEN MARIA 

College Course 

"Fife" aims to be a fashion de- 
signer and after seeing some of 
her drawings — hubba, hubba! 
She dislikes math of any kind, 
jazz versions of classics, snobs, 
and imitations; but "tall, dark and 
handsomes", good music, dancing, 
and laughter, make her purr. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Mirror Art Staff IV. 



LlTTLEWOOD, MARGARET TERESA 
Business Machines Course 
It is Peggy's nature to be shy 
and quiet, but maybe it's for the 
best. She ' might explode if she 
suddenly relaxed. She is friendlv 
towards everyone and has an even 
disposition. Loud people and get- 
ting up at seven every morning 
are "nix" with her. 



LOMBARDO, MARY ROSE 
Business Machines Course 
May has a very unique ambi- 
tion — a desire to visit China. 
She has a vivacious personality 
and is friendly and well-liked "by 
all who know her. Girls who 
hove a whim of changing the color 
of their hair and people who are 
not sociable are "nix" with May. 
Soph. Nominating Committee II. 
Junior Nominating Committee III. 
Honor Roll IV. 



M^GRATH, GRACE Y FORSYTH 

Special Course 

Gracey is the lively, good na- 
tured senior known by nearly 
everyone. She likes all fattening 
foods, much to her despair. She 
a'so enjoys those nightly telephone 
conversations with S. W. Graci'; 
nlans to attend Framingham State 
Teachers' College next year. We 
nil hope that she will return sosv; 
day to teach at Waltham High. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Archerv III. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Volley Ball II. 

Graduation and Class Day Usher 
III. 

Honor Roll I, III, IV. 



MAJOR, JESSIE ISABELLE 
Business Machines Course 
"Reds" ambition is to become 
g moael designer and with that 
flashy red hair she could be one 
herself. Skiing, horseback riding, 
end dancing sne likes. She hopes 
someday to travel to California 
■with a certain man from Harvcrd. 
Jessie dislikes waiting for people 
and crowded buses. 
Dramatic Club J, II. 
Basketball I. 
Archery II. 
Glee Club I. 



MARLINSKA, ELEANOR THERESA 

Practical Arts Course 

Ellie's ambition is to become an 
Air Line Hostess. Her good dispo- 
sition and always being on time 
have won her many friends. Ellie 
dislikes conceited men and people 
that are hard to get along with. 



MCCUSKER, HELEN JOAN 
Business Machines Course 
Helen, who came from Newton 
High School, want3 to travel and 
become a medical secretary. Danc- 
ing ct the "Tote" with A. L. and 
making her own clothes she en- 
joys; people who are always late 
and conceited boys and girls she 
loathes. 
Basketball II. 
Field Hockey II. 
Honor Roll III. 



MCKENNA. CHARLES RICHARD 

Accounting Course 

If you get a glimpse of a Chev- 
rolet tearing down Main Street 
leaving a cloud of dust, you will 
know it's Mac, who wants to see 
the world, but dislikes doing 
homework 

Honor Roll I. 



MCLELLAN. SHIRLEY 

Stenographic Course 

Conceited people meet the disap- 
proval of Shirley, a very weli- 
iiked and naive girl "Tooki" " 
spends her mornings in the corri- 
dor with "D. S." and plans to be- 
come a medical secretary Because 
she is so friendly and completely 
natural, we are sure she will bs a 
areat success. 
~ Honor Roll II. 



MANZER, GLORIA 

Stenographic Course 

Glony's seriousness does not 
hinder her from being popular and 
well-liked. The "sparkler" on her 
third finger, left hand, gives us 
the clue to what her future will 
be. ("nuff" said). Her pet peeves 
are conceited or deceitful people. 

Honor Roll II. 



MARTIN, RAYMOND IRVING 

Practical Arts Course 

"Martini" likes basketball, soft- 
ball, and Sunday walks to Weston 
with that certain young lady. Un- 
reasonable teachers, assemblies, 
and some girls irk him. Not being 
too fond of the navy, "Ray" wants 
to join the marines if the army 
doesn't get him first. He possesses 
artistic ability, a magnetic person- 
ality, and a pleasing disposition. 
He is sure to make his mark in 
the world. 

Senior Nominating Committee IV. 



MCCUSKER, KATHLEEN MARIE 
Business Machines Course 
A trip to Florida with Stella and 
learning to jitterbug are Kay's am- 
bitions. She enjoys dancing with 
a certain person and reading all 
the best sellers, but dislikes wait- 
ing in line lor lunch and tor buses, 
and knowing conceited boys. 
Mirror Yearbook Write-ups IV. 
Honor Roll II. 



MCLAUGHLIN. BERTHA MAXINE 

College Course 

Mac plans to go to the Deacon- 
ess Hospital and become a nurse. 
She is always prompt, conscien- 
tious, and speaks her mind upon 
all occasions Her pet peeve: 
girls who snap their gum, being 
caught in the rain alter a sham- 
poo, and conceited airls. 

Dramatic Club I, II 

Class Day Usher III 

Football Usher III. IV. 

Honor Roll I, II. HI 



MENNELLY. ERNEST ROBERT 

Practical Arts Course 

Ernie, who is good in algebra, 
pnioys bowling, swimming, th» 
920 C';ub, and black and white 
chocolate-malted egg-frappe flop's 
(Is there a doctor in the house?) 
He dislikes homework, talkativ 
| ]". unreasonable teachers. anH 
Hat tires This intelligent young 
man's ambition is to gain world 
fame by traveling to the moon in 
his own special atomic-powered 
rocket ship — Buck Rogers, movo 
ovpr 

Honor Roll I. II 








MESROBIAN, ARMEN ZAREH 

College Course 

Casanova, the pride of room 118, 
says that his ambition is to be- 
come a dentist. He'll probably be 
forced to beat the women off wnh 
clubs. His virtues are friendliness 
end perseverance except in the 
presence of skittish drivers who 
annoy him. 

Honor Roll II, IV. 



MOBILIA, CAROLINE ANN 
Business Machines Course 
Moby is popular with all her 
classmates and will aid them in 
any way possible. Collecting rec- 
ords and singing are her chief in- 
terests. She hopes someday Sally 
will rrrive on time. After this year, 
Moby, your evenings will be all 
yours, free from studying and 
homework. 

Dramatic Club IV. 



MORANG, JOAN ESTHER 

College Course 

Her personality and unique man- 
ner of expression will carry Joanie 
fai in journalism, which she plans 
tc study at B. U. She dislikes 
people who tell tall stories and 
arguments with G. M., while swim- 
ming, skating, skiing, riding mo 
torcycles, and driving a certain 
"37" Ford are among her favorite 
pastimes. 

Co-Editor of Notes IV. 

Gossip Editor of "The Mirror" IV. 

Business Staff Mirror I, II, III, IV. 

Mirror Room Agent I, II, III. 

Literary Staff Mirror II, III, IV. 

Vice-President Pennant Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Basketball II, III. 

Archery II. 

Eowling I, III. 

MORRISON, MARY ELIZABETH 
Business Machines Course 
Betty is rather shy and quiet but 
is well liked by everyone. She is 
thoughtful of others and always 
arrives on time. Being very quiet 
herself, she dislikes loud people. 
Good luck to you on your trip to 
South America. 



MUISE, IDA ROSE 

Stenographic Course 

Ida, the youngest and most cap- 
able member of IV DS 1, doesn't 
let anvone put anything over on 
her. She's always a grand sport, 
even when the jokes are on her. 
With her courteous, quiet manner, 
she will some day make an incom- 
parable private secretary. 

Literarv Staff of Mirror IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



MILLER, WANDA JUNE 

College Course 

"Texas" coming from North Dal- 
las High brought the pictures of 
White Rock and Lake Dallas : to 
Waltham High School. Her am- 
bition is to be an airplane stew- 
ardess and her chief virtue is be- 
ing able to take a teasing. Al- 
ways on the march "Tex" is hap- 
piest when driving the car or rac- 
ing through traffic on a motorcycle. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Pennant Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Graduation Usher III. 



MOBILIA, ALICE' 

Stenographic Course 

"Hey, did you hear this one?" 
That's Alice with her snappy jokes 
and a wonderful sense of humor. 
She has a knack for getting along 
with people, but dislikes those 
who are conceited. She hopes to 
include "B. G." in her future 
plans. 



ALICE MORGAN 



MOSHER, SALLY JANE 

Stenographic Course 

"I object," protests our ever- 
loyal Sal. This clever little actress 
doesn't beat around the bush, es- 
pecially in Mr. 'Hood's - English 
class, when it comes to voicing her 
ingenuous opinion. Her honesty 
and sincerity will carry her a long 
way, and we know she will al- 
ways be successful as a private 
secretary.. We wish her the best 
of everything in life. 

Basketball II. 

Bowling II 

Archery II. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Secretary-Treasurer o 
mere Class. 



Sopho- 



MUISE, MARION THERESA 

Stenographic Course 

If you hear a spontaneous gig- 
gle issuing from a bevy of girls 
in 109, you can count on finding 
Muisie there enjoying one of her 
pranks. People who are not on 
time irk her, but she soon forgets, 
and once again, that bubblim 
laughter is heard echoing through 
the corridors. 

Bowling IV. 



MULA, ELENA DOROTHY 
Business Machines Course 
What was that that whizzed by 
us? Oh, yes, "Terry" the ener- 
getic little Miss. Owning a car 
and traveling around the city with 
her "gang" would suit her. Her 
worst fault is getting into trouble, 
but she believes "all's well tha* 
end's well." Conceited and unde- 
pt-ndable people, and homework 
she definitely dislikes. 

Football Usher II, III, IV. 
Baseball Team III. 



PETER RASARIO MULA 



NEWIS, LEONARD WILLIAM 

Practical Arts Course 

Hear that "buzz" at the back 
oi the room? Lenny can always be 
found right in the middle of it. 
His happy-go-lucky personality has 
made him many friends He likes 
playing Softball, going to Nan- 
tasket in the summertime, and ar- 
guing with his friends. People 
who hate the Irish, teachers, and 
girls who wear too much make-up 
don't rate very well with him. He 
hopes to be serving in the Marines 
soon. 



NOLAN, JOSEPH S. 

Practical Arts Course 

Everyone knows Joe, the tall, 
fclim lad with that fringe on his 
lip. This slick and crafty young 
man could probably talk or bluff 
his way out of anything. Although 
his clever facility for attracting 
linances without apparent physical 
work quite qualifies him to be a 
"loan shark", this mad speed- 
demon tells us that he wants to 
be an under! . • 



NUSSINOW. MIRIAM BERNICE 

Accounting Course 

Mim's ambition is to become a 
!ied Public Accountant Mak- 
ing good peanut-butter cookies is 
nn< of her chief virtues Wo 
for buses and long sideburns on 
fellows are out. 

Pennant Club IV 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Honor Roll I, II. Ill, IV 



MULA, JACQUELINE MARY 
Business Machines Course 
"Twiny's" ambition is to be a 
saxophone player, and if her sax- 
ophone is as good as her singing 
voice, she'll succeed. She enjoys 
sports and getting out of school at 
two (if possible), but dislikes wait- 
ing in line for nylons and doing 
homework. 



MULA, ROSE MADELINE 

College Course 

"For a change, I would like to 
make Norma wait for me!" Rosie 
has a mania for untying bows, re- 
gardless of time or place, but we 
are sure that P. A F. forgives her. 
She dislikes algebra and chem 
lab. constantly fearing to see little 
green men with hatchets come out 
of the test tubes. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. IV. 



MARY NICOLLETTA 

Trade School 



NOONAN, 1HOMAS JOSEPH, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Tom's ambition and destination 
is the U. S. Navy, and with his vir- 
tues of being good-natured, punct- 
ual, and lending money, he should 
be very popular among his bud- 
dies His dislikes are conceited 
girls and waiting for B M , whilo 
cokes, and listening to the 9 2C 
club on days off from school stand 
high on his list of likes. Anchors 
aweigh, Tom! 

Basketball III 

Senior Nominating Committee IV. 



NYSTROM, LOUIS MYRON 

Practical Arts Course 

Lou, who dislikes being called 
"Louie", intends to be in the navy 
air-crew right after graduation 
Hu faults are being late for class 
with "Bob" and borrowing money 
from "Jack" He likes all sports, 
but canoeing most of all W< 
sure that he didn't make any na- 
tion-shaking momen'ous. historic 
decisions while Chief Justice of 
the Big Four Good luck to a 

swell" fellow 






C'CONNELL, WILLIAM FRANCIS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Okey" is that modest, open- 
minded, sociable, and well liked 
senior. He likes swimming, horse- 
back riding, canoeing, and friend- 
ly people. He dislikes homework, 
"slave-driver" bosses, and con- 
ceited people. After he gets out 
of the navy "Bill" wants to get a 
Civil Service job. We wish him 
all success in fulfilling his am- 
bition. 

OLNEY, LORAINE ELIZABETH 

College Course 

If she's cute and pert with 
twinkling eyes, she's "Lori" or 
"Sis." It's Lori's ambition to do 
ing her own Latin homework is 
quite an accomplishment, too. 
Sne's crazy about sports but dreads 
Friday and its tests, 
missionary work in the Philippines 
or in Assam, India, where she was 
born. Her c.nef virtue, patience, 
will come in handy, although d )- 

Basketball II, III, IV. 

Baseball II, III, IV 

Badminton II, III. 

Volley Ball II, III. 

Field Hockey IV. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Football Usher IV. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

OUELLETTE, PAUL JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Paul's natural athletic ability has 
won for him a good name in Wal- 
tham. He likes hockey, football, 
the 9:20 Club, meetings of the Big 
Four, and weekend activities with 
Sally; but is not fond of staying 
after school or waiting in line at 
lunch time. "Oily" wants to bo 
a successful, super-duper sales- 
man. His pleasing personality will 
make him successful in whatever 
he does. 

Football II, III, IV. 

Hockey II, III. 

PARKHURST. FREDERICK W., JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

An admirer of Lincoln and Wil- 
son, Fred, straightforward, sincere, 
and well-informed, is an open- 
minded, idealistic, independent 
thinker. Interested in political- 
social-economic problems, he en- 
voys nothing more than participat- 
ing in fiery debates, especially 
from a decidedly pro-Labor view- 
point. With the help of his Schol- 
arship Fred hopes to attend Bos- 
ton Universitv, majoring in eco- 
nomics and law. His great am- 
bition is to become a United States 
Senate. 

Band I, II, III. IV. 

Orchestra II, III, TV. 

Mirror Write-ups IV. 

PEARSON, BEVERLY MERRITT 

College Course 

Bev goes for ice cream, the color 
oink, "Georgie" and happy people 
The last is probably due to her 
own sparkling personality. False- 
ness and trudgina to school on 
rainy days are definitely nil. Her 
ambition is to enter nurse's train- 
ing. Move over, Doc! 

Cirls' Club Treasurer IV. 

Dramatic Club II, III. 

Honor Roll I, II, IV. 



OLIVO, MARGARET ELIZABETH 
Business Machines Course 
Peggy, with her' sweet personal- 
ity and sociable disposition, plans 
to travel. She dislikes conceited 
men and sarcastic people, but most 
of all, the fact that she is short. 
Cheer up, Peg, all good things 
corne in small packages. 
Honor Roll I, II. 



OUELLETTE, EDNA MARIE 
Business Machines Course 
"Dimples' " ambition is to be a 
sales buyer, that is, if H. A. doesn't 
"put that ring on her finger" be- 
fore she has a chance to get her 
start. She enjoys going to C. C. 
with H. A. and to movies. She is 
loyal and not tardy, but dislikes 
onions and slow people. 



PAPIA, SARAH THERESA 
Business Machines Course 
Sally although small has a big 
ambition as she intends to visit 
Europe some day and to be a 
se-cretary. She enjoys dancing, 
music, swimming, and light-haired 
boys, especially J. She dislikes 
blind dates, going to bed early, 
and people who boast. 
Honor Roll IV. 



PARSONS, AUDREY MADELEINE 

Practical Arts Course 

Petite with personality plus. 
That's Audrey. To win her ap- 
proval one must always be on 
time and be willing to join her on 
a raid on the ice box. She has 
sparkling blue eyes and an ever 
ready smile that makes her one of 
our most liked seniors. We all 
agree that the future looks promis- 
ing for Audrey. How about that, 
Al? 

Dramatic Club II, III, IV. 
Room Agent for Mirror IV. 

Honor Roll IV. 



PEARSON, PHILIP KIMBALL 

Technical Course 

Phil takes time out from his 
piano playing to state that he also 
likes pool, physics, math, and golf 
He says also that he dislikes wo- 
men (except a select few) and 
people who wake him up in Ger- 
man and English. M.I.T. is his 
destination. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 

Orchestra I, II, III, IV. 

Freshman Class Officer I. 

President of the IV-B Jazz So- 
ciety and Glee Club. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



PEELING, JUNE KINCAID 

Practical Arts Course 

"Speedy" plans to attend the 
Wilired Beauty Academy. Her won- 
derful sense of humor has won her 
many iriends. She says her chief 
virtue is always getting Amy's 
lunch. She dislikes doing prob- 
lems in physics and "The Voice — 
Sinatra". She likes the 9:20 Club, 
butterscotch sundies, and Bing 
Crosby. 

Girls' Club IV. 



PETERSON, CARL RUNO 

Accounting Course 

Pete's ambition is to become a 
great golf player. When you hear, 
"You eat the bird, feathers and 
all," you will find, Pete. He loves 
sports of all kinds, but dislikes 
conceited people and wearing 
neckties. 



PORTER, FREDERICK E. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Duckey" enjoys hunting, fish- 
ing, and swimming. He doesn't 
like "stuck up" people, homework, 
and cars that always have trouble 
He is energetic, ambitious, and 
has a friendly manner which will 
long be remembered. His am- 
bition is to own a garage or gas 
station of his own. 



REDDEN, CYNTHIA ANN 

Special Course 

"Hi, Chum" calls Shorty as she 
meets one in the corridors She 
plans to attend the Fisher School 
She likes talking, "Jerry's jokes", 
bowlinq, lunch-time, Saturday af- 
ternoons, and plays She can t 
stand jazz, people who are always 
late, and pennies 

Graduation Usher III. 

Girls' Club IV 

Honor Roll IV. 



r, THEODORE CHARLES 

Practical Arts Course 

Tod is that big, good-natured 
t \,lk who likes just one thing bet- 
ter than telling a good joke and 
that is a certain C S from Wake- 
field His two pet bugaboos are 
vfrkr>nd homework and the odor 
of Jerry Dearborn's pipe Ted 
sprnt the last quarter of his Senior 
year at Hillsboro (N H ) High 
School and plans to attend the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Football II. IV. 

Honor Roll I. 



PIERCE, MAGERY GOULD 

College Course 

Gery can always be found sur- 
rounded by a group of laughing 
girls. Her wonderful sense of hu- 
mor and her jokes (corny but cute) 
always keep spirits high. She 
plans to be a nurse and with her 
on the job everyone will soon be 
well again. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Honor Roll I, III, IV. 



POTTER, DONALD EVERETT 

Accounting Course 

Don is a quiet fellow from 112 
who loves to keep far ahead of 
the class in accounting. He never 
fails to do his homework and al- 
ways has someone asking for it 
Don's chief ambition is to be an 
executive in a large office. 

Honor Roll I. II, III, IV. 



POWER, WILLIAM JOHN 

Technical Course 

Bill is one of the leaders of the 
IV-B boys He hopes to go to 
Boston College or to enter the 
Navy. Well prepared German and 
physics lessons, and promptness 
are his two main virtues. He dis- 
likes Keyes' trips to 113 and the 
long arm of the draft board. 
"Tote" and trips to Scituate al- 
ways leave him smiling. 

President of IV-B Club. 

Junior Prom Committee II. 

Cheer Leader III. 

Honor Roll III. 



READ, NORMA ANN 

College Course 

Normie, ever calm and placid, 
loves hot fudge sundaes, movies, 
riding trolleys, and summer vaca- 
tions, but boiled fish and rising 
early are most distasteful to her. 
Her greatest ambition is to meet 
Gregory Peck, but stunting in an 
airplane, sans parachute, would 
produce the same effect. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Business Staff III 

Art Editor IV. 

Football Usher IV. 



Class Day Usher III 
Honor Roll I. II, III 



R1CCIARDI, GENE MARIE 
Business Machines Course 
Gene enioys meeting interestim 
people, but dislikes gum snapping 
and sloppy sweaters Slaj . 
people on the back and bein? 
slapped (take notice. Nickie W ) 
disgust her. Her quiet and friend- 
ly disposition will blend in beau- 
tifully with those tropical Hawaian 
Islands which she intends to visit. 




1 





RIDENTI, FLORENCE MARIE 

Accounting Course 

Flo's aim is to go further into 
accounting. Laughing at L. L.'s 
jokes and listening to Harry 
James's trumpet are tops. Being 
early and Monday mornings don't 
go with her. With your laugh, Flo, 
you'll go far. 



ANNA J. RIGOLI 
Trade School 



ROACH, JEANNETTE E. 

Stenographic Course 

Jan's ambition is matrimony in 
August. She has a wonderful 
sense of humor, minds her own 
business, and is always found 
quietly at work. With all these 
good qualities, what else could 
Jan over have but happiness? We 
all wish her the best of luck. 

Honor Roll II. 



ROMARD, HONORA ROSE 

College Course 

To be a nurse or a good house- 
wife is "Honey's" ambition. She 
is honest and always on time. Sho 
likes Mr. Morang and the color 
blue. Her main dislikes are snob- 
bish and conceited people. She is 
always being mistaken for her 
twin, but has her own personality 
and charm. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



SAVOIE, MARIE 

Business Machines Course 
Maria, Hawaii bound, enjoys 
skating, dancing, bowling, and 
writing to E. D. She has a very 
pleasing personality. Housework, 
homework, conceited people, and 
being kept waiting she detests. 
Honor Roll II. 



SHEDD, NATALIE 

College Course 

Natalie's ambition is to teach 
lip-reading and speech correction 
Horses and horseback riding rate 
high with her. The thing she dis- 
likes most of all is being called 
by her nickname, "Nat". 

Class Day Usher III. 

Girls Club IV. 

Basketball I, II. 

Honor Roll I. 



ROMARD, GLORIA MARIE 

College Course 

Glor's chief virtues are honesty 
and helping people distinguish her 
frcm her twin. She plans to be u 
nurse. She likes dancing, the view 
of the lake, J. C, and sports. She 
dislikes chemistry problems and 
snow fights. 

Dramatic Club IV. 



RUSSO, ELEANOR LEA 

Special Course 

"Holy mackerel!" cries "Mugga" 
as she hears something that 
amazes her. Her chief virtues are 
eating, sleeping every afternoon 
(it gives her energy and pep for 
the next day), and doing home- 
work! ! ! "Mugga" dislikes con- 
ceited people. She likes sundaes, 
9:20 Club, Bob Hope and most of 
all going to N. H. to see R. B. and 
J. F. 

Volley Ball IV. 

Dramatic Club IV. 



SCHIEBECI, THERESA MARY 

Accounting Course 

Terry's ambition is to be success- 
ful in office work, and her best 
virue is writing letters to P. Q. in 
the army. Her chief dislikes are 
homework and Monday mornings. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Red Cross Representative IV. 

Honor Roll II. 



SHERMAN, RICHARD ARTHUR 

Accounting Course 

Dick's ambition is to become a 
successful farmer. He is always 
on time, and dislikes noisy girls 
and conceited people. 

Junior Nominating Committee II. 



SIMMONS, CHARLES FREEMAN 

Practical Arts Course 

This tall, lanky, industrious senior 
is quiet, conscientious and refined 
in appearance. Simmy dislikes 
jazz and talkative people. His 
calm, unassuming manner will un- 
doubtedly win for him many 
friends during his long journey 
through life At present he is un- 
decided about the future, but we 
know that whatever he attempts 
will succeed. 



SMITH, JOHN EUGENE 
Business Machines Course 
Smitty's greatest desire is to get 
ccross the country in his "blue 
Beetle." His chief dislike is get- 
ting blamed for something he 
didn't do. He claims his hobbies 
to be ping pong, bowling, and 
girls. 

Hockey II. III. IV. 



STARMER. ELEANOR MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

Eleanor is a friend of everyone 
who knows her Her sparkling 
blue eyes radiate friendship to alL 
With her sweet personality, El- 
eanor will always be successful as 
a secretary. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Honor Roll II. 



SULMONETTI. WINNIFRED ETTA 

Stenographic Course 

Winsome Winnie aims to become 
a medical secretary and also to 
study music If you have ever 
heard her play the piano during 
gym, you, too, will know that she 
is going to be a success in 
musical world. Dancing, music, 
and skating are her chief likes, 
while her only dislike is dominant 
people 

Honor Roll II. 



SWEET, JOHN FREDERICK 

College Course 

To go to Harvard Medical Col- 
lege and become a great doctor is 
lack's ambition His chief virtues 
are his "sweet" disposition, quick 
wit. and intelligence He enjoys 
reading all types of novels and 
being a free man "Wimmen" 
seem to be his mam dislike, but 
he is always friendly to everyone 

Nominating Committee III 

Honor Roll I. II, III. IV. 



SMITH, BERTHA BELL 

Stenographic Course 

When Bert wished on a certain 
star, she expressed the desire to 
have our country free from the 
strite of war and everything that 
goes with it. She wants to travel, 
and because of her grave manner 
and disposition, who knows but 
she may some day be one of our 
greatest foreign secretaries. 

Literary Stalf of Mirror IV. 

Bowling IV. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



SPAGNUOLO, EM1LIO V. 

Technical Course 

"Spag", IV-B's quiet, friendly, 
all-A student, plans to study at 
M. I. T. to become a chemical 
engineer. He likes chemistry, 
math, German class, study penodo 
with Connie, and IV-B without ties, 
but Chester's handshake and 
Keyes's valentines annoy him. 

President IV-B Honor Roll Club. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



STUMPF, RICHARD FREDERICK, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Dick is that friendly and popular 
senior among both girls and boys. 
We shall always remember his 
prowess in football, etc., which has 
brought the teams to many a vic- 
tory. He plays all sports — main- 
ly football, hockey, and basket- 
ball — and enjoys the Totem Pole. 
Bob Hope, and being an active 
member of the Big Four. He wants 
to go to college and become a 
successful business man if the 
navy doesn't interfere. 

Football II, III, IV. 

Hockey II, III, IV. 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

President Senior Class IV. 

President Junior Class III. 

SWEENEY. JOHN JOSEPH 

Accounting Course 

"Jay Jay's" ambition is to get 
a job where you don't have to 
work hard He likes to go swim- 
ming and dancing and hates doing 
homework and waiting for people 

Football II. Ill, IV. " 

Basketball III. IV. 



TANKEL. SIDNEY JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Sid. who is enterprising, ener- 
getic, and well-informed, is very 
good in algebra and English He 
participates in many sports, has a 
aood sense of humor, and his 
friendly manner is liked by all 
People who are not on time and 
silly girls annoy him He intends 
to study in the Massachusetts Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, and undoubted- 
ly will make a practical business 
man We all wish this intell 
young man good luck 

Policy Advisor to Mirror Editor 







TARANTO, ADELINE ELEANOR 

Accounting Course 

Adeie hopes to go far in busi- 
ness. Her best virtue is her smile; 
her worst tault is chipping nail 
polish from her fingernails. If you 
I war someone saying, "She's goi 
holes in her head," you know 
"Ad" is around. 



TOLAN, RICHARD E. 

business Machines Course 

Dicks ambition is to go to Beni- 
ley end become a successful busi- 
ness man. He likes to be frank 
end to see a lot of A. F. He hates 
talkative and silly people. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 

Co iports Editor Mirror IV. 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Junior Nominating Committee 11/. 



TURNER, JANET ELEANOR 

College Course 

Jan's chief fault is cutting her 
own hair with a scalloped boarder 
effect, but her frankness and ready 
grin make up for it. Her ambition 
is to work her way around the 
world after graduating from col- 
lege. She heartily dislikes homo- 
work and jelly-filled chocolates. 

Basketball III, IV. 

Bowling II, IV. 

Volley Ball II, III, IV. 

Baseball II, III. 

Badminton II, III. 

Archery II, III, IV. 

Humor Editor IV. 

Nominating Committee II, III. 

Assistant Editor III. 

Honor Roll I, II. 

WAGNER, MARJORIE VIRGINIA 

College Course 

"Jori", a real student and friend, 
is bound for the Fisher School in 
Boston. Arguing or laughing with 
"Gery", whose jokes she doesn't 
enjoy, or driving the car whenever 
possible are among her pleasant- 
est pastimes, while chem. lab's 
assortment of evil odors, especially 
th^t of H?S, annoy her no end. 

Honor Roll I. II, III, IV. 

Graduation Usher III. 

CJirls' Club IV. 

Football Usher IV. 

WALSH, LEONARD PAUL 

Practical Arts Course 

Len is that likeable bov from 1H. 
whose keen sense of humor has 
kept us amused throughout hiah 
school. His virtues include "lend- 
ing" money to his nals and trying 
to keep out of trouble. He thinks 
that he shouldn't be expected to 
Ir-ijah a* "co r """ iokes, and dis- 
likes being called to the office o- 
?.)0. His friendly disposition w'M 
u e an asset to him in the future. 
He w-n's to ; oin the Marines, al- 
Ihouah he wi" probably end uo a 
second Bob Hope. Best wishes, 
"Len". 



TERRASI, ANTIONETTE FRANCES 
Businoss Machines Course 
Toni, always seen with a smile 
on her face, makes others forget 
their troubles and can always be 
depended on for gaity, promptness, 
and neatness. She dislikes people 
who imitate others, and conceited 
men. Keep on smiling, Toni, and 
the sun will keep on shining at 
Sun Valley until you get there. 
Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



TOWNSEND, NORMAN WILLIAM 

Accounting Course 

If you hear "How's your head?" 
you are sure to find "Squeaky". 
He'd rather be in school than out- 
side, but dislikes people who ask 
too many questions, swear, or are 
in love with themselves. 



VARNEY, ALBERT HAMILTON 

College Course 

Good-looking Al came here from 
ilewton High in 1943 and has 
carved himself a favorable reputa- 
tion. He likes sports and the pro- 
verbial three. He claims he is 
easy to please but doesn't enjoy 
school, or anything like work. He 
plans to attend the Massachusetts 
School of Optometry next fall. 

Basketball II. 



WALKER, RAYMOND HOWARD 
Business Machines Course 
Ray's chief ambition is to become 
a great farmer. He likes to be 
frank and truthful, but hates con- 
ceited people, especially fellows 
his own age. 



WARE, AUDREY MERNA 

Stenographic Course 

Aud's ambition is to become a 
writer, and, if she does as well in 
this profession as she has done 
in the Class Will, ,we know she 
will be a success. Piano playing, 
reading, and bicycling take up 
most of her time, while the re- 
mainder is spent "waiting for 

Bowling II, III, IV. 
Volley Ball II, III, IV. 
Baseball II. 
Badminton III. 
Class Day Usher III. 
Dramatic Club III. 
Writer of Class Will IV. 



WATERHOUSE, HARRY COLE 

Accounting Course 

After Red gets his diploma, he 
is looking forward to his car and 
to joining the Marines. He expects 
later to attend Art School. He en- 
joys sports, dancing, apple pie and 
ice cream, popular tunes and short 
women. He dislikes double dates 
and homework. 

Football IV. 

Hockey II, III, IV. 

Mirror Advertising Staff III. 



WENCKUS, FAY MARIE 

College Course 

"Florence Nightingale Wenkus" 
or "Wenk" wants to be a nurse. 
Her chief virtue is making friends. 
A meeting of the "big four" and 
pickles are the height of perfection 
10 her. She dislikes Catty girls 
end being in "the know." 

Vice President of the Class II, 
III, IV. 

Advertising Staff of Mirror II, 
III, IV. 

Co-Business Mgr. of Mirror IV. 



WHITE, SHIRLEY ANN 

Stenographic Course 

This vivacious miss intends to 
become a great dramatic actress, 
and, when she exhibits her exten- 
sive vocabulary and versatility, we 
know she will be appreciated by 
her many admirers. 

Dramatic Club II, III, IV. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 

Volley Ball II, III. IV. 

Bowling II, III, IV 

Junior Prom Committee III. 

Honor Ron II, III. 



WILLS, ELEANOR DENTON 

College Course 

Known to her friends as "Bud- 
gey". Eleanor's destination is 
rather uncertain, but no doubt she 
will make a success of whatever 
she tries This blonde miss dis- 
likes snakes, and people who are 
quiet and demure Advising "Jack- 
ie" and finding out the choice 
r.ews keep her busy. 

Dramatic Club II, III, IV. 

Mirror Staff III 

Honor Roll I. II. Ill, IV. 



WITHROW, CHARLES ARTHUR 

Accounting Course 

Art wants to join the navy and 
then go into farming He is al- 
ways on time and dislikes home- 
work and a certain redhead. 
Wonder who that could be? 



WATERHOUSE, HELEN 

Practical Arts Course 

Everyone who knows this girl 
with a charming personality w ; ll 
agree she is just "tops". She 
hopes to become a children's 
nurse. She abhors snobbish people 
but likes apples, dancing, her twin 
brother (Red), movies, and the 
9 20 Club. Her good sense of hu- 
mor and her interest in everyone 
has won her many friends. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Girls' Club IV. 

Mirror Room Agent IV. 



WHITE, JACQUELINE 

College Course 

To go to college and become a 
social worker is Jackie's ambition. 
Any study period becomes a pleas- 
ure with witty good-natured Jackie 
on the scene. She likes basketball 
players, dancing at "Tote", rac- 
ing around Waltham with her 
other half, and being mistaken for 
"Budgey", but conceited people, 
and bus rides drive her to tear out 
her hair. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III. 

Class Day Usher III. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 



WHITNEY, HAROLD ATWELL, JR. 

College Course 

To become an architectural en- 
gineer is Hal's ambition. He likes 
photography, a good baseball 
game, neat and simply dressed 
young ladies, and fishing in a 
trout stream Whit is easily upset 
by girls who dress older than their 
years, or by being late for ap- 
pointments. He attended Mt. Trin- 
ity Academy, 1942-3. 

Mirror Photographer II, III. 

Dramatic Club III, IV. 

Mirror IV. 



WINCHESTER, MARJORIE EVA 
Business Machines Course 
Along with many others, Cud- 
dlts's ambition is to travel. Danc- 
ing to Danny Kaye's singing (es- 
pecially with R. T.) and ice-skat- 
ing are tops with her She is 
fiiendly with all her classmates, 
end dislikes the thought of study- 
ing and homework. 



WROE, SALLY WALTON 

College Course 

Lift up the curly bangs and 
you'll see Lark, whose destination 
is the University of Wisconsin 
where she'll study to be a buyer 
She enjoys meetings of the "Big 
and telephone calls, but is 
definitely down on rainy week-ends 
and chem. lab periods 

Cheerleader IV 

Pennant Club President IV. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Dramatic Club III. IV. 

Graduation Usher III 

Honor Roll II, IV. 






YETTEN, CAROLYN CARLTON 

College Course 

Carolyn's good sense of humor 
and congeniality have made her 
popular among her classmates. 
She likes to swim and ride horse- 
back. Silly sophomores are one 
of her chief dislikes. Carolyn 
hopes to graduate from the Uni- 
versity of Vermont and then to 
travel in Europe. We all wish her 
the best of luck in her future plans. 

Diamatic Club IV. 

Girls Club IV. 

Honor Roll I, II. 



Z.AMMITO, PAULINE FRANCES 
Business Machines Cours'e 
Paulie s good nature and friend- 
liness will aid her whereever she 
goes. "Smile and the world smiles 
with you" is her motto, (but she 
never has a smile for the teachers 
who give her afternoon sessions). 
In later years, she plans to take 
a trip to New York and Chicago. 
Loads of luck, Paulie. 



ANTHONY J. DENORSCIA 
Trade School 



JAMES J. GENEROSO 
Trade School 



YUNGHANS, CARL 

Technical Course 

"Gunner" believes in the olc' 
maxim, "Early to bed and early 
to rise ....," for he gets up at 
4:00 A. M. each morning to do hir, 
homework. Working and studying 
he considers his chief virtues. He 
plans to study for the medical pro- 
fession at Tufts. 

V/inner of the History Contest III. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 



ALBERT V. DEVEAUX 
Trade School 



JOSEPH C. LUCCHESE 
Trade School 



E.RNEST F. O'CLAIR 
Trade School 




BENGTSON. EDWIN J. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Happy" 's ambition is to live a 
life of peace and quiet. This quiet 
senior is a friend of all and is al- 
ways a good sport. He dislikes 
girls, homework, and Deople that 
wake him up when he's sleeping. 
He attended school in Newton dur- 
ing his sophomore year and spent 
his last two years here at Wal- 
tham High School. 

Football III, IV. 

Baseball III, IV. 



FAVRE, GEORGE HENRY 

Stenographic Course 

George is the "lone wolf" of the 
Stenographic course and intends to 
become a leading figure in the 
business world or a reporter, and 
we are sure that with his brilliant 
mind he will succeed in whatever 
he does 

Literary Staff of Mirror III, IV. 



GILBERT, RENEE SUZANNE 

College Course 

To enter tne diplomatic field is 
"Riki's" favorite ambition. Friend- 
ly, cneeriul, and optimistic, she 
makes friends very easily. Hign 
on her hit parade are dancing, 
table tennis, and going to the 
theatre. Straight irom Prague, 
Renee has entered the life of W. 
H S. with mucn entnusiasm. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Vice-Pres. of Dramatic Club II. 



JOHNSON, ANNE KITTRIDGE 
Business Machines Course 
Quiet and reserved, but at the 
same time very friendly, Johnny 
came to this school at the half 
year from Milton High Making a 
games, but can't stand homework 
good secretary of herself is her one 
ambition. She likes writing short 
stories and attending baseball 
and time test in typing. 



ST. GERMAIN. PAUL JOSEPH 
Business Machines Course 
Paul's ambition is to be a suc- 
cessful stock manager at Ed S' 
Germain's service station he :s 
the boy who will sell you a '. 
car, even though you have a ' 
buick. 



SULLIVAN, ROBERT F. 

Practical Arts Course 

Sully, who can be heard saying, 
Can't see it", is an ambitious 
boy who spends his spare time 
working at the Watertown Post 
Otfice. He has a deep yearn-.ng 
foi Braintree and roller skating 
Before entering the Postal Service, 
he would like to serve a hitch in 
the Navy. 

English High 1943 

Do-chester High 1944. 



FURDON. WILLIAM EDWARD 

Special Course 

When questioned on why lie 
isn't on time. Big Bill just says, 
"Better late than never " He likes 
spcrts and drinking cokes at Joe'e 
His ambition is to become a pro- 
fessional football player and we 
know he will be successful. 

Football II, III. IV. 

Basketball II, IV. 

Basketball II, IV. 



MURPHY. PHYLLIS 

Business Machines Course 

Our Norwegian classmate hopes 
some day to visit the country of 
her grandparents. During the war 
she was a devoted member of the 
C. A. P. C. and enjoys flying with 
R. D. Phyl dislikes lunch period: 
(how could you, Phyl?) and hav- 
ing to bring notes in on time. 

Bowling IV. 

Archery IV. 

Honor Roll II 



ZENO. ERNEST 

College Course 

Ernie's the well-known, weli- 
built Mr. Football at W. H S. hav- 
ing been in two all-star games 
He likes being alone with Pea 
exercise at the "Y", and only one 
sport Dislikes are his old nick- 
name, show-offs, and loud-mouth^ 
Ernie would like to play for Ala- 
bama and then coach a team that 
would have the sharpest uniforms 
imaginable And he can do it 

President Sophomore Class II 

Football II, III. IV 

Mirror Sports Editor IV 





SENIORS ALL 

Dignified Seniors strolling out of Waltham High on opening day, September 5, 1945 



tjjTVWk 




AU 




DOROTHY LOCKHART 

Writer of Class Poem 



CLASS POEM 



AND NOW, VOYAGEURS 

Twelve years ago a ship was launched: — 

Our school life had begun. 

"Good Luck," sang those who wished us well; 
"God guide you on your run." 

A little timid, we set out 

Striving to do our best. 

Storms came our way, but on we sailed, 

For Learning was our quest. 

A pestilence fell on the earth. 
"But us it shall not touch." 
It mattered little to us then, 
But soon it mattered much. 

The call for help soon reached our ears. 
We answered, quick and sure 
Some left our ship to join the hght, 
The hardships to endure. 

First darkness closed around our ship; 
Then peace (our joy was great) 
Into the shadow cast by War 
Began to penetrate. 

And now we see our port ahead ; 
At last the goal we've reached. 
"Farewell, kind guiding crew. We shall 
Remember what you've preached." 

We part, but never shall forget 

Our mates throughout these years, 

Or our good voyage which taught us this: — 

"Press onward, without fears." 



Dorothy Lockhart, '46. 



CLASS PROPHECY 



Tomorrow science win 

unfold to an unsuspecting 
world the unexplainables of 
today. Atomic energy, cosmic 
rays, television, and radar will 
have been but a few of the 
stepping stones to a new 
era — a new world. Today's 
automobiles and aircraft will 
belong to yesterday, and the 
youngsters will try to contain 
an overpowering sensation to 
smile at our day", for they 
will never fully understand 
what the "old days" were like 
and what they meant to us. 

Yes, Class of 1946, be it 
prophesied here that just as 
Columbus discovered the New World we shall ex- 
plore and find a new universe — and a new life. 

The footsteps in the corridor of time slowly 
die 

We raise all eyes toward Sclovonia — the land 
of Tomorrow, where we will find our new Uto- 
pian universe and our new life. 

Sclovonia was accidentally unearthed by the big 
"Five". While escaping from the income tax col- 
lectors, their crippled rocket twisted downward to 
an unmapped wilderness. They had disappeared 
from the face of the earth, and soon the big 
"Five" were but a memory. 

But, before long, weird tales anil scraps of in- 
formation started to trickle back to earth. Internal 
Revenue Investigators Marie Dorval and I had 
been on the trail of these five "birds" for quite 
some time. "Dorv" and I were languidly loitering 
in Lindstrom's Loungeaway, where we found the 
frappes most enlightening and where Dick Ham 
was practically a piece of the furniture We had 
been hashing over the possibilities of Arthur La 
Rosee's newest addition to the srientifi< world 

with "Shorty" Hooper and Beanpole" Gray, bul 




MARJORIE C. GARDNER 
Writer of Class Prophecy 



I found it almost impossible 
to concentrate on such trivial 
matters as science with "Ham- 
mie" strolling around, un- 
protected. 

Someone mentioned Davis- 
son, so, being of sound mind 
and remembering that he was 
No. I "Hubba Hubba Man" 
in '46, I quickly bolted 
towards Marie Savoie, Millie 
Cardillo, and Sarah Collura 
who sputtered that "Diet 
Smith" Nystrom. Bob "Holly- 
wood" Davisson, "Muscles" 
Stumpf, "Handshake" Frary. 
and |ack "Beau Brummel" 
Dwyer had gone off on one 
of their excursions and had never returned. 

"Stooge" Ouellette, one of our confederates 
(but supposedly one of their shady friends) 
tipped us off that the big "Five" had discovered 
a new planet in the solar system, about $53,053,- 
700,792^ miles from Mars. He said it was 
literally "drooling" with gold. ("G2" was im- 
mediately notified!) 

George Gordon, executive head of "G2", wast- 
ed no time. He contacted Dorval and me and 
ordered us to proceed to Sclovonia. survey its 
natural resources, and set up an International Tax 
System. 

M\ colleague and I raced down to Art With 
row's rocket held and had our new supcr-atomi/cd. 
double condensed space ship with a vlaeglamated 
ffotSSam rolled out on the take off platform. (Tlu> 
super deluxe creation was just put on the market 
by Haynes, Haynes, Haynes, lones. Haym 
Company.) There is a thunderous roar, a streak 
of light, and we are Sc lovonia-bound 

Meanwhile, unknown to us. Sal!, 
had overheard our conversation about the dis 
covery of gold By some >inoeden< 



whirl-wind migration commenced to Sclovonia. 

Papers screamed of Sclovonia! Congress was 

called into session! The population of 

the United States was rapidly decreasing. 

Senator Frederick W. Parkhurst, Jr., Speaker of 
the House, was heard to say, "Ah-ah-ah-aw, nuts!" 

Feature writer Audrey Ware of the New York 
Times stated in her Wednesday column, "The 
biggest lie the propaganda machine has pro- 
duced!" (The New York Police are still looking 
for Miss Ware, who vanished Thursday under 
mysterious circumstances.) 

"Walter Winchell" Gallitano broadcast that she 
had it from a reliable source that Miss Ware 
hitch-hiked a ride to the "gold fields" with Alice 
Mobilia, "Tre" Hayes, Cynthia Redden, Margery 
Pierce, Franny Cronin, and Mary Lombardo in 
Le Blanc's rocketeer, whose fuselage displays in 
bold print — "Through These Portals Pass the 
World's Bravest Women." 

Yes, there is a great gold rush! The marvels 
of the Tecktofinder, Teleatmosphericvision, and 
Atom-driven rockets bring Sclovonia nearer to 
planet Earth. It is but a matter of hours before 
people are flooding the new planet. 

Our first stop after arriving is Illigos, the cap- 
ital of Sclovonia. What a metropolis! 

Treading our way through tin cans, (which 
seem to be piled in front of the State House) I 
inquired for his Honor, Mayor Stumpf. (He was 
the boy with his eye on a spot with the Bruins in 
'46.) I was flatly refused entrance. "Bumpy" 
Jacobs mumbled that Mayor Stumpf was in the 
throes of work writing ten volumes on "The 
Chances of the Unknown" or "Why I Didn't 
Make It". (I told Ida Muise to take that down 
in her little black book.) 

Feeling rather discouraged but not in an alto- 
gether hopeless state, I contacted Kelley's Pool 
Hall on my walkie-talkie. "Kelley's Pool Hall — 
Callahan speaking," ejaculated a husky voice. "Say, 
Tommy, is 'Buttsie' Adams, fourth assistant Sec- 
retary of State there?" 

Yah, he's here; who wants to know?" Tommy 
asked inquisitively. 



I slammed down the receiver and dashed down 
to Kelley's before "Buttsie" could make an escape. 
"Buttsie was draped majestically over a pool table 
when I interrupted his reverie by bluntly men- 
tioning that the income tax in Sclovonia had not 
been paid. This query brought forth "Shoulders" 
Favre, "Strong Arm" Cincotta, and Ed "I'm It" 
Bengston, "Buttsie's private bodyguards, who, see- 
ing "Butts" turn suddenly pale, wished to know 
what the score was. 

Noticing a bulge where the chest should have 
been and fearing the atmosphere had affected my 
sense of sight, I left rather hurriedly only to find 
out later that he was carrying around a spare bas- 
ketball for "Paleface" Bryson. 

I trudged back to the State House and collapsed 
on the steps while Dorval looked for a place to 
rest my weary bones. I chased a newspaper that 
was blowing about the yard and became engrossed 
in Morang's Gazette, the paper that knows all, 
sees all, and tells all. (Gee — quite a paper!) 

"What's Happening in Sclovonia" by Paula 

"The Brain" Franchina. 

****** 

A new statue has been placed in Hobo Paradise 

Park. It symbolizes Fran Anderson, the "Zero 

Kid". Inscribed at the bottom is this legend 

"They shall not pass." ("Police take notice"). 
****** 

Bill Frary, formerly a member of the big 
"Five", was exiled from Sclovonia last week, be- 
cause he ate the legs off "Diet Smith" Nystrom's 
pet caterpillar "Feebie". 

*j* *P *|> 2|* *|C rf* 

Flash The Sclovonia Specials, alias the 

big "Four", met on February 13 to discuss and 
pass legislation on and about the markets which 
were over-crowded with grasshopper legs. "Diet 
Smith" Nystrom ate l,l40,000i/ 2 dogs and three 
grasshopper toes while the "Four" were in ses- 
sion the "Four" will meet next week to 

remedy a shortage in grasshopper legs. 
****** 

"The greatest play to hit little old Sclovonia!" 
exclaims critic Jane Flagg. "A new play had its 



*i 



sensational premier here last evening at Whitney's 
Theatre. It was a tragedy entitled "Little Nug- 
get — The Miner's Child", starring Dick Hosmer, 
Shirley Anne White, Alan Duplisea and Louise 
Collins. Written, directed, and produced by 
Sherlie "De Mille" Babb. Costumes designed by 
Norma Read and "Ginny" Johnson." 

* * * * * * 

The candidates entering the semi-finals for the 
title of "Miss Sclovonia of the Year" are: Lor- 
rayne Conway, Joan Home, Ruth Haag, Millie 
Carr, Ann Carter, Elizabeth Harnett, Jessie Major, 
and Marjorie Winchester. 

Dancing tonight (it says here) to Dick Tolan 
and his Syncopated Six at Swgonhaven. (I wonder 

if it's any relation to the Tote?) 

****** 

(Um-m, advertisements too — What's this! ?) 

"Have you Spring in your heart and Fall in your 

arches — hmm-m? Come to Pearson's Snazzy 

Shoe Shoppe!" (Oh, brother! — that's all!) 
****** 

It was then that Dorval came thundering up the 
street. Hey, Marge!" she piped. 

"Did you find a place?" I shouted hopefully. 

"No, there isn't a vacant place in town; that 
is, except a boarding house for sale. 

"Let's buy it! We'll go 40-60 on it," I chirped 
merrily. 

Yah. 1O-6O, just like last time. Arc you sure 
that's right, Marge?" Dorval naively asked. 

"Sure. Do you question my integrity, Miss 
Dorv.il/ I tried to appear hurt, way down deep 
in my little, twenty-four karat gold heart. 

"No. That is, well, gee whiz! You always 
seem to get the most money out of every venture 
we invest in!" complained Dorval. 

Money! Money! Money! Is that all you think 
about? Listen! I invest (0 per cent in the bus 
iness. and you invest 60 per cent When the 
profits come rolling in I get 60 per cent and 

you get 40 per cent. That eomes out 100 per tent 
e.n h. doesn't it '" 

"Yah," she nodded doubtfully. 



"All right! What are you kicking about? 
(After all, I got A in bookkeeping. I ought to 
know what I'm talking about ! ! !)" 

So while Dorval was buying and running a 
boarding house, I set a bear trap to catch a big 
wolf who is trying to escape paying Sclovonia's 
income tax. (Yes — you've got the right wolf — 
President Bob Davisson. ) 

While waiting for my "booby trap" to catch 
Davisson, I amble about Illigos, taking in the ex- 
traordinary scenes that made this a truly different 
planet. 

"Ray Martin, where are you?" I froze in my 
tracks ! 

"Ray Martin, where are you, now?" (It was 
spring cleaning time, and the former Helen Chas. 
was looking for her hubby.) He was nowhere to 
be found — per usual. Helen heaved a sigh and 
sat down on the steps disgusted, when around the 
corner came "Simon Legree" Wenckus snapping 
her snake whip — "Helen! Have you seen Al 
Varney?" (They were both in the same boat). 
So they got their heads together and decided to 
play a little trick on their husbands. Each wrote 
letters and sent them through the mail to one an- 
other saying: 
Dear Helen, 

When your husband is away again, let me know, 
and I will come up to see you. 

(Signed) Jimmie Bell 
The other: 
Dear Fay, 

He sure to let me know when your husband is 
away, tor I am just dying to sec you again. 

(Signed) Duk Dugan 

The next day. I passed two verv beaten up" 
characters, while on my way to the hoarding house 

(Poor Jimmie and Duk') 

Yes, Dorval and I had finally fulfilled a lite 
long ambition to establish a boarding house for 
\|.'/ Only. As Sclovonia was mobbed with gold- 
thirsty people, we had a thriving business I 
thought my eves were playing tricks on me when 
Ro\ Swish" Arbuthnot. Duk Hartlett. I ddie 



Borger, Jack Smith, Charlie McKenna, and Sid 
Tankel sauntered in. It wasn't enough that the 
"booby sockers" swooned all over our front steps, 
but we let Ernie Zeno and Walter Keyes in, and 
from that day forward, we couldn't get rid of 
Peggy Johnson and Janet Turner. 

Yes, this Boarding House for Men Only was a 
nifty enterprise and had its compensations, but we 
did encounter some very disturbing influences — 
girls, in particular. They crept into our house- 
hold one by one under false pretenses. Peg Free- 
man and Jeanette Boudreau posed as waitresses, 
while Loraine Olney, Dot Lockhart, Marjorie 
Langill, and Wanda Miller claimed they were 
"haters" and just wanted a good position that pro- 
vided a roof over their heads. I told them that 
they would have to go down the street to the 
Boys' Club. My old buddy, Sally Mosher, was 
now president and could probably accommodate 
them all very easily. They all giggled and went 
away happy. 

I was at my wits' end waiting for my trap to 
catch something, so I trotted over to the Bachelors' 
Club to see some of my old "cronies". I found 
the place desolate. (Traitors to the cause — that's 
what they are!) I trudged wearily back home. 
("Me" best buddies — runing out on me in an 
hour of need.) The morning paper confirmed my 
suspicious. The "Mula Twins", "Tootsie" Arrigo, 
Betty Morrison, Alice Kelley, and June Peeling 
were married at a twelve ring ceremony yester- 
day. (I have lost all faith in women!) 

The event I had been anxiously awaiting for 
weeks finally arrived. As "Junior G-Man" Dudek 
used to say — "I got my man!" 

President Davisson and his right-hand man, 
"Rocko" Flannery, strutted into our exclusive 



Boarding House for Men. It was too late when 
they recognized us. Escape was impossible! 
(Gerry Dearborn, Carl Yunghans, and Reynold 
Famosi were conveniently leaning against the only 
door.) 

I showed my credentials to my bewildered vis- 
itors. They looked at each other in a half-hearted 
way, as much as to say, "It's a joke, son!" 

But it was no joke! "G2" had got its man! 

At the State House, head bookkeeper Miriam 
Nussinow gave me all the information on the 
financial status of Sclovonia. Pauline Berry, 
Phyllis Dowcett, Janet Duddy and Julia GeofTrion, 
private secretaries of the big "Four", supplied ad- 
ditional data, which helped my colleague and me 
set up, pass, and put into effect, the first income 
tax law in Sclovonia. 

Some people might say — "The moral of this 
story is — no matter where you go, you can never 
escape paying your income tax. 

But most of us here today will know there is 
something deeper herein than a mere narrative, a 
kidding around, and a mentioning of fellow class- 
mates' names. This is not only a temporary 
means of fun on the occasion of this, our Class 
Day, but also a permanent, traditional document 
of the Class of 1946. 

As you sit out there today, I wonder if maybe 
someday this prophecy might be proved true in 
part by one of you. There are planets yet to be 
unearthed. There are inventions yet to be in- 
vented. 

We shall not all become famous, that's true, 
but we can all become great. Great within our- 
selves — great in heart. 

We can prove this for we are the To- 
morrow. 

Marjorie C. Gardner, '46. 



CLASS HISTORY 



3| T WAS spring, 1970, and 
I was in a rather reflective 
mood. I had worked my way 
up to become one of the bet- 
ter authors in America, but I 
knew that if I could produce 
one more great book, my 
fame and fortune would be 
made. I had already written 
tragedies, comedies, drama;, 
and romances; but I had 
never tried anything histori- 
cal. Finally my mind was 
made up. I would write the 
history of my old Class of 
19i6 at Waltham High. 

After long research in old 
records and diaries and after 
writing down all I could remember, I had the 
grounds for my new book. 

Most of the class had come up from junior high 
in their Sophomore year, young and innocent. 
There were some who spent their Freshman year 
at the high school, and had black and blue marks 
to prove it. Maybe it was only a coincidence, but 
Waltham sports began to boom just as we arrived 
on the scene. The football and basketball teams 
h.nl championship years and the hockey team did 
fairly well. Then came the baseball season and 
most of the big heads at W. H. S. went back to 
normal, if not smaller. The class officers that 
year consisted of the following: F.rnic Zeno, 
President (a fellow who dabbled in football a 
bit) ; Fay Wenckus, Vice-President; Sally Mosher. 
Secretary; and Walter Keyes, Auditor (the boy 
with bulging muscles). The Sophomore Social. 
the bi^ event of the year, went off without a hitch 
under the able direction of the aforementioned 
Walter Keyes. At the etui of the year, most of 
the class dashed off to the defense factories to 
make hay while the sun shone, and some of the 
boys entc red the sc r\ u c. 




Writer of Class History 
LEON GREENE 



The next year, "The Gold- 
en Era of Waltham Sports" 
was thrown into the trash 
barrel, as the football, basket- 
ball, and hockey teams showed 
nothing exceptional. The 
baseball team was doing well 
if they came anywhere near 
their opponents. The class 
officers that year were Dick 
Stumpf, President; Fay Wen- 
ckus, Vice-President; Frances 
Barrow, Secretary - Treasurer: 
and Dick Ham, Auditor. 
Once again the big event, this 
time the Junior Prom, was a 
bi^ success, that man Keyes 
again taking the bows. 
But these two years were strictly warm-ups for 
the big Senior year, when we were going down 
the home-stretch towards Commencement. For 
officers in our first peace-time year, we elected 
Dick Stumpf to give us a few choice words every 
Monday morning; Fay Wenckus, Vice-President- 
Frances Barrows, Secretary-Treasurer; and Irving 
Haynes, Auditor. 

The sports picture was a little rosier with the 
hockey and basketball teams being the recipients 
of two rather cjuestionable decisions in being de- 
prived of the hockey championship and a Tech 
Tourney invitation re s pectively, The football 
team, with its two cylinder attack of Zeno and 
Stumpf or. to save myself an argument. Stumpf 
and Zeno. finished over .*><)() .\n^\ even one w.is 
fairly content. The baseball team assured even 
body that they would do better than the previous 
ve.ir and stranger things have happened. The one 
and only Senior Dance, under the direction ot 
Marine rv and cohorts, w.is strictly ultra ultra in 
c\cn way and successful financially also 

I now had the foundation and pattern for my 
teller; now to m\k\ the incidentals .ind color 



I could remember vividly gazing into 250 up- 
turned faces at Class Day and noting the fact that 
all the boys were wearing ties, even Sid Tankel. 
This, in itself, was something undreamed of and 
just illustrates how powerful is tradition. 

There was nothing outstanding to distinguish 
this class from any other, but there were number- 
less little things. For one, there were the subtle 
ways the boys used to drive a teacher mad, by vi- 
brating the floor, uttering strange noises and 
words, and placing their fingers around their 
noses. The average boy of the Class of 1946 
usually appeared dressed in a lumberjack or sharp 
jacket, with old creaseless pants rolled up at the 
cuffs, to reveal rainbow-colored socks, and bet- 
tered shoes — definitely no ties! As for the girls, 
from bobby-sockers to glamour girls there was no 
such thing as average and I wouldn't dare try to 
describe them. With characters like Eleanor 
Russo, the Mula twins, the "zany" members of the 
IV-B Club, and many others, the history would 
make terrific reading. 

The Mirror made its first appearance of 1945 



in 1946, under the editorship of some fellow 
named Brown or Blue or something. This same 
fine upstanding lad also edited the Year-Book, 
(hard covers, that is) ; and then, after tabulating 
the class Who's Who, writing the Class History, 
and selling Mirrors on Hall's Corner, vanished 
from mortal sight, waving a diploma and laugh- 
ing fiendishly. 

There were two regular organizations, the 
Dramatic Club, and the Pennant Club, the latter 
giving way to the Girls' Club in 1946. The Dra- 
matic Club gave three one-act plays as its yearly 
feature; and the class had its own Senior Play, 
"The Fighting Littles", with Sherlie Babb, chair- 
man of the committee. 

That was enough ! I could see it now. My 
great epic of the Class of 1946 would take its 
place with the world's great historical novels. My 
lifelong ambition would be fulfilled. All I 
needed was a dedication, and then that too came 
to me: "To the Class of 1946, for three of the 
most enjoyable years I have ever spent, or hope 
to spend. 1*11 never forget you." 

Leon Greene, '46. 



UPON THE ROCKS 

Upon the rocks of Ocean Bluff — 
Here high above the tide, 

With seaweed green and water rough, 
And seagulls by my side! 

Look down ! Oh, look ! Look down 
Two hundred feet and one; 

The ocean in its sinky gown 
Lifts whitecaps to the sun ! 

But here I stand upon the top, 
Greeted by tugboats' song. 

It seems as if it's only a hop 

To the fleeting tugboat throng! 

The rugged craft send forth a puff; 

To me the sound spreads wide, 
With seaweed green and water rough, 

And seagulls by my side! 

Craig T. Allen, 1944. 



CLASS WILL 



4£|jE it remembered that we, 
the Class of 1946, being of 
sound and disposing mind 
and memory, although some 
of our teachers may wish to 
debate that, and wishing to 
direct in what manner our 
possessions shall be disposed 
of after our departure, do 
make and publish this, our 
last will and testament. Af- 
ter payment of our just debts, 
according to the new dollar- 
down- fif ty-cents-a-week-we'll- 
get-your-money credit plan, 
we bequeath and devise as 
follows: 

To Mr. Goodrich, our pa- 
tient and understanding headmaster, who has pi- 
loted his appreciative pupils through the maze 
and intricacies of high school life, we bequeath • 
mechanical man named Mike. Mike has a brain 
so well developed that he will not only run er- 
rands and deliver notices, but will, upon request, 
conduct morning assemblies unassisted, leaving 
Mr. Goodrich free to perform his numerous other 
duties. 

To Mr. Ward, our beloved senior class adviser, 
an inspiration to all who know him, who in earlier 
days was better known by the fond title of 
"Geofgie", we leave a modem, revised version of 
the dictionary, called "Jive Talk' or Get Hep to 
the Jive. Jackson". We appreciate having had his 
excellent advice, and those who have been fortu- 
nate enough to have him will always consider him 
as one of the most loved and valuable members of 
the Waltham High School staff. 

To Miss Woodward, the efficient director of the 
Business Department, whose ability for obtaining 
jobs for her students was one of the causes of the 
ibolition of the W. P. A., we bequeath a portable 
short wave set which will enable her to communi- 




Writet of Class Will 
AUDREY WARE 



cate with all parts of the 
building with ease. If Miss 
Woodward is detained in her 
office, she can "tune in" on 
the typing room to detect any 
conversation between her pu- 
pils, although they will, of 
course, be busily typing. 

To Mr. Hood, our versatile 
and peppy English teacher, 
whose remarkable perform- 
ances of Macbeth, Lady Mac- 
beth. Hamlet, Julius Caesar, 
and Brutus have enriched his 
classes, we leave a Lady Es- 
ther make-up kit, which in- 
cludes a triple-view mirror, a 
waved wig for the part of 
Lady Macbeth, various kinds of daggers, and even 
drops of bright red blood, so that he may present 
his performances in a more realistic manner. 

To Miss Flagg, an integral part of the business 
course, who is always as busy as the proverbial 
bee, we bequeath a pair of shiny, ball-bearing 
roller skates on which she may reach her next 
class, usually at the other end of the building, be- 
fore her speedy pupils do. With these skates is 
included an instruction booklet entitled How to 
Roller Skate in Five (ouch) Painless Lessons" 

To Mr Sheeny, that ingenious biology teacher 
oi Waltham High, who never fails to have a 
large supply of pickled grasshoppers on hand, we 
bequeath a motion-picture film named "Bugs" 
This reel portrays the private life and loves of 
scAcral t\pcs dt amoebas. anthraponls. and para 
ir.ee la. too. which Mr Slue In can peruse at his 
own leisure 

To Miss ( lenient, our interpreter of the me- 
chanics ot the French language, who can speak 

1 rench more fluently than Charles Boyer, and 

sin_;s it too (remember the Marseillaise ). wc 
a huge stack of travel folders, yellow with 



covering France and adjoining European countries. 
Of course, the earliest reservation would be about 
I960, but as Miss Clement browses through these 
pamphlets, she can at least dream of the day when 
she may leave Friday afternoon aboard one of the 
super-modern atomic power ships, and easily re- 
turn in time for her Monday classes. 

To Mr. Mosher, Waltham High's contribution 
to the literary field, we leave a pen which is guar- 
anteed — not for a month, not for a year, not for 
a lifetime — in fact it is not guaranteed. With 
this pen, however, we hope he will continue writ- 
ing those most exciting murder mysteries, and 
perhaps even compose a super-duper horror epic, 
which will, when produced on the Inner Sanctum 
program, make even its bravest fans quake and 
tremble with fear. 

To Miss Mooney, our well-liked shorthand 
teacher, whom we missed very much during her 
long absence from school, we bequeath a new 
senior division for her home room. Those who 
were in her 1946 class hope that the new one will 
be a far more silent group, but in case they are 
not, we leave her a snappy pair of rose red ear 
muffs, which she may don if the clamor becomes 
too overwhelming. 

To the Class of 1947, who will inherit the 
courageous teachers who have led us gently but 
firmly through our never-to-be-forgotten senior 
year, we bequeath the whole of Waltham High 
School, for it is theirs during the next year. If 
they are lucky, they will take our exalted positions 
and become the glorious leaders of our school. 
Let us hope that they will benefit from all pleas- 
ures, dreams, and homework that come in a typi- 
cal senior year. 

We hereby nominate Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Garra- 
han, and Miss Cunningham, all of Waltham, as 
co-executors of this our last will and testament. 
We hereunto set our hand in the presence of 
these three witnesses this sixth day of June in the 
year one thousand, nine hundred and forty-six. 

Class of 1946 
By Audry Ware 



CODICIL TO THE LAST WILL AND 
TESTAMENT 

Be it remembered that we, the class of 1946, 
being of sound and disposing mind and memory, 
I still insist, and wishing to direct how our estate 
shall be disposed of after our departure, do make 
and publish this, the codicil to our last will and 
testament. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Theresa 
Hayes class of 1946 executrix of this, the codicil 
to our last will and testament. 

To Amelia Cardillo, the girl who was unani- 
mously voted the one most likely to succeed and 
the most studious girl, a co-business manager of 
the Mirror and one who casts a threatening shad- 
ow on Professor Einstein's career, we bequeath a 
pretested scale which she can use in later years to 
weigh her ideas and formulas before presenting 
them to her public. 

Dick Stumpf, that all-round athlete of W. H. S., 
who has been a smashing hit in the football, 
hockey and cafeteria line, our Junior and Senior 
year president, has been chosen as the most pop- 
ular boy and the most atheletic boy. To this class 
favorite, we bequeath a bottle of the new Hubba 
Hubba Vitamin Pills, which contain energy almost 
equal to that of the atom bomb. By taking only 
one of these pills a year, Dick will always remain 
as popular, magnetic, and energetic as he is now. 

To Craig Allen, our most studious boy, who is 
seldom seen without an armful of books and mis- 
cellaneous school supplies, we leave a variety of 
the latest funnybooks, so that when his brain 
grows over-taxed, Craig may relax by scanning 
the pages of these o-so-popular magazines. 

To our class wits — yes wits, for they are the 
rollicking Mula twins, Jackie and Eleanor, we be- 
queath a box of assorted rubber bands so that 
they will never be at a loss for a snappy comeback. 

To Irving Haynes, who was chosen as the boy 
most likely to succeed, whose magnetic personality 
attracts many friends, we bequeath a recently- 
published book of figures, edited by Varga. We 
are sure that this is one book of figures that 
Irving will never find dull. 



To Phyllis Bryson, the star athlete of the girls' 
sports world, to whom any swimming pool, base- 
ball and football equipment, or bowling alley is 
a challenge, who, we hear, is now considering an 
offer to act as the Leopard Woman opposite Tar- 
zan, we leave a bottle of that highly invigorating 
liquid, Sloan's Liniment, which should keep her 
in excellent athletic form. 

To Dick Hosmer, the outstanding actor of 
Waltham High's year, whose performance in such 
plays as "A Friend of the Family" was enjoyed 
by all, we leave a glittering gold star. When 
Dick becomes a movie idol later in life, he can 
tack this gold star on his dressing room door and 
paint his name above it in a corresponding shade 
of gold. 

To Lorrayne Conway, who was elected the best- 
looker in Waltham High, and whose many charms 
have enticed her friends and won her boyfriends, 
we give a large jar of Edna May Wallace's mud- 
pack facial, which she may use, as age creeps on, 
to retain her youthful beauty. 

To Charlotte Leavy, the leading lady of our 
stage, who will be stiff competition for Helen 
Hayes, Katherme Cornell, and Ray Milland, too, 
some day, we bequeath a sturdy umbrella so that 
if she ever needs protection from any overripe 
vegetables while on the stage, she will have the 
umbrella to defend herself. However, we doubt 
if she will ever use it except when it rains. 

To Bob Davisson, our best looking boy who is 
the idol of our bobby-sox crowd, who never needs 
to whistle at girls — they whistle first, we leave 
a bottle of Shaeffer's shoe polish, which, we hope, 
will help him maintain that charming, polished 
look. 



To Phyllis Caplan, that cute little trick with 
the extensive wardrobe, who was voted the best- 
dressed girl, we bequeath something we borrowed 
from Dorothy Lamour. It's a sarong, of course, 
and when Phil finds some day that she "hasn't 
got a thing to wear", she can don this piece of 
apparel and perhaps start a new, new style. 

To dark-eyed, dark-haired Louise Collins, that 
girl with the glamor plus, the Waltham High 
counterpart of Hedy you-know-who. we leave- 
some very powerful smelling salts. After Louise- 
has strolled by a group of what is commonly 
known as eager beavers, she may use the smelling 
salts to bring the boys out of their swoons. 

To Jack Dwyer, an authority of what the well- 
dressed man should wear, who looks as if he had 
just stepped from a page out of Esquire (the 
magazine for men), we give a polka-dotted, red 
and white bow tie, which may not always match 
his ensemble, but which will forever be a reminder 
of his high school friends. 

The Class of 1946 does not endorse the afore- 
mentioned products, but any money for free ad- 
vertising should be sent to Audrev M Ware, and 
she will make good use of it. 

We hereby appoint Mr. Lees. Mrs. Lees, and 
Mr. Elliott (no relation to the Leeses) as co- 
executors of this, the codicil to our very last will 
and testament. 

We hereunto set our hand in the presence of 
witnesses on this, the sixth day of June, A. D. 
L946. 

Signed Tin ( i \-s > » [9 ,<•> 
By Audrj v Waki 



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MOST STUDIOUS 

x^ J CRAIG ALL£N 




SALLY WROe LOUISE COLUN? 
PERSONALITY GLAMOl 
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ELXANOR..RUSSO 
BRIGHTEST SOCIAL LIGHT 



OtARLOTTE LLV 

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RICHARD 
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T4-IE r-IUUM TWINS 



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AMELIA CARDILLO 
MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED^ 
flOST STUDIOUS / 








IRVING 4-|AYNE^> 
BOy MOST LIKELY TO 
SUCCEED/ 





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OlCIC_ l STUMPF" 

MOST AT+lL€Tic r50Y — 

MOST POPULAR^ / 




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PHYLLIS CAPITA N 






Cctivilwi* 




SENIOR PROMENADE 
Seated: Shirley Ann VC'hite, Virginia Johnson, Barbara Bigham, June Home, Amelia 

Cardillo, Janet Turner. 
Standing: Emory Olson. Irving Haynes. Robert Davisson, Gerald Dearborn, YX r alter 

Keves — Chairman. Richard Tolan. 





SCENE AT SENIOR DANCE 







GRAND MARCH AT SENIOR DAM E 




SI MOR DAM I ( 0MMITT1 1 
Front R"i, Peggy Freeman, Sally Wr.'<. June D.ii<\. Louise Collins. 

Robert Davisson, Francis Anderson, & -Jon. Robert 

Flannety ( ruirman. Richard Stumpf, Albert \'»: 







m 




MARI K.HI^ 01 




SENIOR NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Standing: Richard Hosmer, Thomas Noonan, Richard Ham, Raymond 

Martin. 
Seated: Marjorie Gardner, Elizabeth Harnett, Helene Borger. 










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WHEN WE WERE KIDS 





GONE ARE THE DAYS 






DRAMATIC CLUB 

DRAMATIC CLUB OFFICERS 

1945 - 1946 
Elizabeth Jackson, Treasurer; Sherlie Babb, President; 
Marilyn Gowell, Secretary; Howard Read, Vice-President 

Dramatic Club Masquerade Dance 
Teachers at the Dramatic Club Masquerade Dance 




PROPERTIES COMMITTEE OF DRAMATIC 

CLUB PLAYS 

Seated: Margaret Koundakjian, Evelyn Postman, Barbara 

Hunter, Jane Flagg, Beverly Land. 
Standing: Raymond Comeau, Howard Read, David Hay. 




"THE PAMPERED DARLING" 

Presented by the W. H. S. Dramatic Club Thursday, 
March 7th, in the Assembly Hall. 
Bruce Butters, Donald Bigham, Howard Goodell, Betty Ann 
Gowell, Norman Wagner, Esther Whitelaw, Freda 
McLaughlin, Shirley Fleming, Barbara Johnson, 
Howard Bruya, Louisa Collins. 




DRAMATIC CLUB MASQUERADE DANCE 





PENNANT CLUB 

PI NNANT Ml B OFFICERS 
I >'iv Coolidj I.- Storing, \ Jcnt ; 

Charlotte Leavy, Treasurer. 
5 Sally \\ iik. President. 






ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



At this time I wish to thank all those who made 
the publication of the Mirror possible this year. 
We have tried to do a little better each year and 
this year we had two distinct improvements: pic- 
tures in the Christmas Issue and hard covers on 
the Graduation Issue. These are precedents, in 
the Mirror 's long history, of which we are proud. 
Let us hope they continue in years to come. 

It is difficult to single out individuals who stood 
out in connection with the success of the Mirror, 
but I shall try to name a few. 

First, a bouquet to our large and efficient 
Business and Advertising Staff, headed by Amelia 
Cardiflo and Fay Wenckus. Their's was the un- 
heralded but hardest task of soliciting advertise- 
ments which put the Mirror "over" financially. 

The Art Staff outdid themselves, if that is pos- 
sible, with their professional-style sketches and 
cartoons which were definitely one of the big 
selling points of the Christmas Issue. Credit goes 
to Mrs. Devine and Miss Russo, the faculty ad- 
visers, and Norma Read, Virginia Johnson, and 
Kathleen Le Lievre for outstanding work. 

Our photographic staff of David Law and Hec- 
tor McLean did a commendable job, especially on 
the sports' action pictures, some of which would 
do credit to Life or any other fine picture publi- 
cation. 

The Literary Staff turned in an excellent variety 
of stories which appeared in the Christmas Issue. 
We trust everyone enjoyed them. A special salute 
is in order for Mr. Hood, whose project "Ameri- 
cano", by his English classes, was done especially 
for the Mirror and went over very well. 

We had our fingers crossed when we allowed 
each senior homeroom to elect their own write-up 
agent, so that the writer would know his subject 
better. It worked out better than expected, how- 
ever, and we hope to continue this system in the 
future. Thanks to all this year's Write-up Staff 



whose names appear in the front of the yearbook. 
The Mirror room agents were the ones who did 
the final job of selling and distributing the Mirror 
after we had all finished our duties. Their un- 
sung job also deserves mention. They are: 

013 Margaret Koundakjian 

015 Theresa Chaisson 

106 Ernest Pintabona 

107 Joan Higgins 
109 Theresa Hayes 

112 Runo Peterson, Miriam Nussinow 

LI 3 Eleanor Campesi 

114 Audrey Parsons 

115 Helene Borger 
111 Louise Hayes 

117 Estelle Deveau 

118 Peggy Frizzell 

201 Malcom Wetherbee 

203 Harold Whitney 

204 Phyllis Keirstead 

205 Waldemar Tilly 
207 William Brennan 

206 Muriel Crossland 

2 1 1 Shirley Seymour, Clara Nicholson 

213 Charlotte Sulkin 

214 Gerald Dearborn 

215 Mary Bowler 

216 George Gregoricus 

217 Robert Adler 

218 Joseph Morreale 
307 Winifred Rourke 

406 Shirley Hill, Jean Swanton 
We are also deeply indebted to many others in- 
cluding the various advisers, the Walt ham News- 
Tribune, Mr. Nottenburg and the boys of the 
Trade School print shop, Miss Grover's Senior 
Typing classes, and editors and staff members of 
the Mirror. I leave the reins in the capable hand 
of Howard Read and I am confident he will keep 
the Mirror on its upward way next year. 

The Editor. 



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.... ....... ... .... 







Louise Collins 
Model at Cronin's Coke Carnival. 



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Sophomore and Junior Class Officers 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
Lome MacArthur, President; Lilian Wilkie, Secretary-Treas- 
urer; Betty DiMurro, Vice-President 





SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 
Standing: William Driscoll, Secretary-Treasurer; Dennis 

Comeau. 
Seated: Robert Damoiseau, President; Harold Williams, 

Vice-President. 



JUNIOR NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Standing: Esther Whitelaw, Clark Campbell, Rusty Mula, 

Bruce Butters, John Gallagher, Jean Lear}'. 
Seated: Barbara Hunter, Ruth Collins, Joanne Wright. 




A ten** moment at the Everett game. 




A lull in the Brockton game. 



FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 




WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL SQUAD — SEASON OF 1945 

1st row, left to light: Ted Reidt, John Stanton. Paul O'Brien, John Sweeney, Harry Waterhouse, Ernie Zeno. ((.apt.) 

Bill Creonte, Lionel Le Blanc. 
2nd row: Ted Erickson, Walter Jones, Bill Frary, Clark Campbell, Patsy Cacase, Don Bigham, Roy Mogan, Al Dc- 

Sisto, Eddie Ben^ston. Tony Bahros. 
ird row. Irving Haynes, Paul Ouellette, Don Gibbs, Jimmy Bell, Don Policy. Tony De Xorscia. Jimmy GenevOM, 

John Hansbury, Marvy Robinson. 
4th row: John Bent, Al Scafidi, Al Peaslee. Frank Clementi. Walter Hallowell, Dick Ham, Dick Dugan, Joe 

Chiasson, Lome MacArthur, Warren Meade, Al Taranto. 
5th row: Bill Foley, Robert Mosher, Louis Nystrom, Bob Goudy, Charles Miniace, Ernest Whiteneck, Harry Woolley, 

Bub Dakin. Ndrmie Roy, Dick Stumpt. 
Front row mascots: John Brown, Pal Dunham. Bernard Murphy. 



FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 




FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE 
Patsey Cacace, Bill Frary, Lome MacArthur, Bill Creante, John Stanton, 



Sa^SJfcF. 



FIRST STRING TACKLES 
Pat Cacace, Paul O'Brien 






THE FOUR HORSEMEN" 
Normie Roy, Bob Dakin, Ernie Zeno, Dick Stumpf 



WALTHAMS STAUNCH 

FULL-BACK 

Power House Zeno 



FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 





COMPARISON! 
Paul O'Brien 

Bill Crcontc 



THI MAIN SPRINGS OF THE 

W A ITU AM II AM 

Dick Stumpf - half-beck 

lirnic Zcno — fullback 




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w Ai i HAM HIGH S I rVMOl S I ND i\\ INS 

Megan, Paul Qucllcttc 



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FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 




PANARAMA OF WALTHAM - RINDGE GAME 






EVERETT GAME, NOV. 3, EVERETT 32, WALTHAM 7 

Full-back Sam D'Agostino making a 15-yard-gain toward end of first half, 

with the human debris in his wake denoting what was happening to 

Waltham all that day. 



FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 




The Tackling Dummy "Takes ,i Beating" 
from Dick Stumpf 





l\ II R( 1 PIin\ BY DI( K STl MIT 



FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 









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JUNIOR VARSITY — 1945 




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A MIGHTY COACH AND HIS RIGHT HAND MEN 

Left to right: Doc. Corrigan, Coach Jack Leary, Frank Collins, 
Rube Krol, Coach Walter Brinn 




OUTSTANDING SPORTS FIGURES 

Among those present at the banquet and Ice Follies evening 
tendered to our teams by the Athletic Association were the out- 
standing sports figures of 1945 - 1946 pictured above with their 
coaches. 
Standing: Dick Stumpf, Fran Anderson, Jimmy Bell, Ducky 

Keane, Ernie Zeno, Wallie Keyes, Roy Arbuthnot, Normie 

Roy, and Lome MacArthur. 
Seated: Coaches Jack Leary, Art Quinn, Walter Brinn, and 

Warren P. Elliott, treasurer of the A. A. 



Hockey with Coach Walter Brinn 




COACH WALTER BRINN 



If you should wander out near Totten's pond 
during the winter and hear "Hurry, hurry," you 
will know that Waltham's popular coach, Walter 
Brinn, is putting his hockey team through their 
paces. 

It is no wonder that "Frenchy" is a success at 
coaching, his lifelong ambition, for while at Wal- 
tham High he set a record of being the only one 
ever to win nine letters in sports. Two years in 
succession he was an All-Scholastic catcher in base- 
ball; in football he was noted as a very speedy 
and shifty left half-back, particularly outstanding 
in receiving forward passes. He was a member 
of the 1922 team which won ten and lost but one 
to Fitchburg, 7 to 6; incidentally, Mr. Hood was 
student team manager that year. Frenchy w.is 
also captain of the basketball team for two years, 
but because there was no organized hockey here 
at that time, Frenchy would 'skip" basketball 
practice and get a few of the "boys " together to 
scrimmage Weston in hockey. 

After graduating from Waltham High, Ml 
Brinn attended Coburn Classical Academy in 
Maine, where he had his first chance to play or- 
ganized hockey, and where he was elected captain 
of the hockey team. After graduating from ( 
burn he attended the University of Illinois, wh 
he gained fame as an Outstanding catcher in base 
ball. 

After returning to Waltham. he coached semi- 
pro and amateur basketball and baseball extcn 
sively When he took over coaching duties at 
Waltham High, he was made duct v out in foot- 
ball and head track coach. He now supervises 
physical education at North Junior and has High 
School classes two Jays .» week 



Up to the time Mr. Brinn returned to Waltham 
there was no organized hockey here. During his 
fifteen years coaching of Crimson hockey, his 
teams never ended up lower than fourth place. 
Frenchy maintains the best record of games won 
and lost in the Bay State League — Waltham hav- 
ing won the championship in '35, '36, *1 and be- 
ing finalists in '34, '37, ' 10 and '46. Notice how 
Waltham all but dominated the league from 193 I 
to 1937. Perhaps this fact was partially responsi 
ble tor Mr. Brinn's election as President of the 
league in 1936, the office which he has retained 
ev« since. Although he refused to pick his best 
team, he did say that his teams of '35, '40, and 
16 were about even in that the '35 and '46 teams 
were- undefeated and the '40 team lost but one 
game. Frenchy also refused to pick an all-star 
team saying that he has had so many players who 
would qualify that he refused "to go out on 
a limb." 

Brinn-COached teams are bv far the most color- 
ful aggregation on Greater Boston schoolboy id 
The Crimson's red. white and blue uniforms .ire 
believed to be the only schoolboy outfits copied 
from a professional team. The red |crst\s with 
the horizontal blue and white stripes and the let- 
tering set an angle at ross the front of the je- 
arc copied from the old Canadian team 

Mr Brinn's spare time, what little there is. is 
devoted to his family: his wife, also ■* Waltham 
High graduate and his three sons Walter. Jr., who 
already shows promise as I future hokev star. 
Ronald: and the baby. Stephen 

Richard Tolan. 



I 



HOCKEY 




WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY TEAM 
SEASON OF 1946 

Front row, left to right: Dick Ham, Don Keith, Dick Stumpf, 
Irving Haynes, Jimmy Bell, Harry Waterhouse, Dick Bartlett. 

Back row, left to right: Coach Walter Brinn, goalie Fran Ander- 
son, Will Rundlett, John Hansberry, Charley Metz, Jack 
Wolfenden, John Coville, Lome MacArthur, Dick Fleming, 
Dick Dugan. 



SUMMARY 

Waltham High's hockiests ended their season 
with a record of seven wins, three ties and no de- 
feats, thereby gaining the distinction of being the 
only undefeated team in the four suburban school- 
boy leagues. Although they remained undefeated, 
scored more goals than Needham, and had less 
scored against them, they could do no better than 
get second place in league standing. This pe- 
culiarity is due to the fact that Bay State League 
rules state that when two teams are tied in points 
at the completion of the play-offs, the team with 
the greater number of victories will be champion. 
Since Waltham tied three games (two with B. C. 
High and one with Needham) and Needham tied 
but one, the latter became champion. Had the 
Brinn-men scored but one more goal in either of 
their tie games, they would have become 
champions. 

Waltham's puck chasers were by far the best 
all-around team in the league. The Brinn-men 
had within their ranks the highest scoring line, 
the second and third highest scorers in the league, 



a smooth working second line, the best defense 
due, and an all-star goalie. 

Every member of the first team was placed on 
one of the all-star teams. Stumpf, the second 
highest scorer in the league, Bell, one of the fastest 
skaters in the league, Ham, one of the biggest, 
roughest, and best defensemen, were all on the 
Bay State all-star first team. Anderson, the cool- 
est, calmest goalie in the league; Keith, the hard 
checking defenseman; Haynes, third highest scorer 
in the league; and Dugan, one of the best puck 
handlers, were on the Bay State all-star second 
team. 

Although Bartlett and Waterhouse were not 
chosen on an all-star team, it would be a grave 
oversight not to compliment them on their fine 
playing. 

Richard Tolan, '46. 

Waltham —8— Wellesley — 0— 
The Brinn-men opened the season with an im- 
pressive show completely out classing Wellesley, 
and giving Andy, the Zero Kid, his first shutout 
of the season. Waltham's smooth working second 



HOCKEY 



line opened the scoring with Dick Bartlett getting 
the first goal and Waterhouse getting the assist. 
Harry Waterhouse got the second goal with Dick 
Bartlett getting his second point of the day by 
way of an assist. Here the first line took over the 
scoring with Bell and Stumpf getting two goals 
and two assists which made the score four to noth- 
ing at the end of the second period. Three min 
utes after the opening of the third period Jimmy 
Bell made it 5 to 0. Before the period ended 
Dugan scored twice with Bartlett getting both as- 
sists, and Don Keith made a brilliant solo to make 
the score eight to nothing. 

Waltham — 5 — Framingham — — 
Andy turned in his second shutout of the season 
at the expense of Framingham. Haynes, unassist- 
ed, lit the red light for the first time in one minute 
of the second period. The next score didn't come 
until the third period when Jimmy Bell scored the 
goal in the fastest time of the year, 1 1 seconds, 
on a pass from Dick Stumpf. One minute later 
he slammed home another goal on a pass from 
Stumpf to Haynes. Stumpf also got tally num- 
ber four unassisted, four minutes after Bell's goal. 
Dugan lit the light for the fifth and last goal of 
the game. 

Waltham — 9 — Norwood — 0— 
Hapless Norwood fell victim of the Brinn-men 
as Andy turned in his third whitewash of the 
season, and Haynes had a field day. Three min 
utes after the opening whistle Haynes took a pass 
from Stumpf and slipped the disc past the Nor- 
wood goalie. Twelve seconds later the same pair 
came down the ice and scored, this time Stumpf 
scored and Haynes assisted. Bell and Haynes each 
scored again in this period; Johnny Hansburv. 
third line winger, also got a goal on a pass from 
Lome MacArthur. Haynes made it six to nothing 
in one minute of the second period; he also got 
his second point of this period getting the assist 
on a goal scored by Stumpf at the eight minute 
mark. Cick Stumpf scored tally number eight 
with Haynes and Hell getting the assists, Haynes 
scored his fourth goal of the afternoon with |im- 
my Bell getting the assist 

Waltham —4- Watertown — — 
Anderson, the Zero Kid. handed in his fourth 
shut out of the season in a game that threatened 
to break out in a fr.uas .it am minute Haynes 
opened the scoring in less than a minute of play 
in the first period on a pass from Jimmy Hell. 

The red light lit for the second time in 51 
seconds of the Second period with Dick Stumpf 



slamming home a goal on a pass from Bell to 
Haynes to Stumpf. Haynes scored tally number 
three on a pass from Don Keith just 51 seconds 
before the bell. 

In the third period Crimson's offensive defense- 
man, Don Keith, took the puck down the ice and 
passed to Dick Stumpf who slipped the disc past 
the Watertown goal tender. 

Anderson was called on twice to prove his 
ability; each time Waltham had a man in the 
penalty box, Watertown sent five forwards dow n 
the ice, but to no avail. 

Waltham —7— Walpole — 2— 
The Crimson racked up their fifth victory of the 
season with Walpole being the victim; however, 
the Brinn-men were scored upon for the first time. 
Stumpf scored the opening goal in the first period ; 
Moore of Walpole scored their first goal to tie 
the score at the end of the first period. Bell 
opened the scoring in the second period with 
Stumpf getting the assist; later Bell scored again. 
Moore of Walpole came back and scored again 
and made the score read Waltham J, Walpole 2. 
Four minutes before the period ended. Stumpf 
took a pass from Haynes for tally number four. 
Jn the third period Ham, Haynes and Bell scored. 

\\ altham -1-- B. C. High — l— 
In one of the closest games this season Wal- 
them went into the tie column. Cattaneo of B. 
C. High opened the scoring three minutes after 
the opening whistle. There was no other scor- 
ing in this period and none in the second even 
though the Brinn-men showered Casey of B. C. 
Hi^h with shots. 

Four minutes after the third period began. Dick 
Stumpf took the puck down the ice, passed to 
Dick Ham. Ham to Dugan, Dugan to Stumpf, 
and the game was deadlocked. Throughout the 
remainder of the period most of the play was in 
the B ( /one .\nd shots were bouncing off Casc\ 
right up until the final bell. 

Waltham -3 — Needham — 3 — 

In one ot the roughest games of the season, 
the Brinn-men tied league-leading Needham 
\\.n\ it not bed) tor the many needless penalties 
handed to Waltham. they would have been \u 
torious 

Smith ot Needham opened the scoring while 
the ( rimson was minus ,i man in the first period. 
However. Hell and Stumpf bounded b.uk Hell 
getting the coal and Stumpf tfa 

In the second period Roman put Needham in 
the lead, but not for long. 20 seconds ^ftcr 
Roman s goal. Keith took the puck down the 



fk f& ™' Cb 




THE BIG SIX OF '46 
Following goalie Fran Anderson come Don Keith and Dick Ham, 
rugged and hard-hitting defensemen; Dick Stumpf, Irving 
Haynes, and Jimmy Bell, one of the highest scoring lines in 
Waltham High and Bay State League hockey history. 




Waltham had what hockey experts call "depth" during the 
1946 season, the principal reason for this being its sterling second 
line of Dick Dugan, Dick Bartlett, and Harry Watcrhouse. 



HOCKEY 




Walt ham's Great First Line — High Scoring Unit of the 

Bay State League during the 1946 Season 
Left to right: Dick Stumpf, Jimmy Bell, and Irving Hayncs 



and passed to Dugan, who split the twine to tie 
it up again. With one minute left to play in this 
period Roman put Needham in the lead. 

Late in the third period when everything looked 
dark for Waltham, Dugan again slammed the 
puck by Wallace to leave the game in a deadlock. 

Had it not been for a five-minute misconduct 
penalty handed unnecessarily to Don Keith, Wal- 
tham would have given Needham their first de- 
feat. While Don was sitting it out, Roman scored 
twice through his position. 

Waltham - - ■()— B. C. High — 0- 
For the second time in as many trys Waltham 
and B. C. High battled to a tic; in this case a 
scoreless tie. This was truly a battle of the 
goalies; however, the Zero Kid, Franny Anderson, 
had the best of it as the play was mostly in the 
B. C. zone. More than once shots off the sticks 
of Stumpf, Bell, and Haynes bounced off Casey. 
Waltham's smooth working line of Dugan. Bart- 
Iett, Waterhouse kept Mr. Casey busy all after- 
noon. 

Waltham —A— Walpole — 2- 
Irving Haynes opened the scoring in the lirst 
period of the opening play-off game. Haynes 
took the puck from behind his own net. skated 
the length of the rink and behind the Walpole 
net, came out on the side and slipped the dist 
past the Walpole goal tender. This was the only 
score of a fairly tame period. Seven minutes after 
the second period opened. Dick Stumpf took a 
pass from Don Keith and slammed the puck home. 
Songin of Walpole spoiled any hopes of a shutout 
by scoring unassisted two minutes after Stumpf 'a 
goal Before the period ended, the Brinn men 



had a two point lead by way of a goal off the 
stick of Dick Bartlett on a pass from Jimmy Bell. 
Shortly after the third period opened, Waltham's 
lead was narrowed to a single point by way of a 
goal by Lee of Walpole on a pass from Songin. 
The Crimson regained their two point lead on a 
goal by Stumpf with Haynes getting the assist. 



Waltham 



Needham — 3 — 



The Brinn coached aggregation ended the '45, 
16 season undefeated by handing the champion- 
ship Needham Club a decisive defeat. 

The tempo was fast all of the three periods, 
undoubtobly the fastest game this season. In 
spite of this, the first period was completely score- 
less, but a total of five penalties were assessed, 
three of these went to the Brinn-men. 

Fifty two seconds after the scvond period 
opened, Haynes took a pass from Jimmy Bell and 
slammed it past Wallace of Needham to open the 
scoring. Six minutes after this goal. Roman of 
Needham tied it up unassisted. Two minutes 
later Dick Stumpf put Waltham in the lead again. 
unassisted. Before the period ended. Sabroski of 
Needham took a pass from his teammate. Roman, 
and put the game into a deadlock. 

If took rive minutes of the third period before 
the Brinn-men were again in the lead bj waj ol 

an unassisted coal, the entire length of the rink 
by Dugan Roman again tied things up two min- 
utes after Dugan's coal by taking .» pass from 
Hcrsey. After this goal, it looked as though this 
was to be a repitition of the first meetinc <>t tt 
teams However. Haynes took the puck in the 
Waltham zone, skated down the ice, passed to 
Dugan. and the Brinn men went into the lead 
again, this time to remain there anil win the game 



HOCKEY 



Goals Assists Penalties 



SEASONS RECORD — VARSITY AND 



Stumpf 

Bell 

Haynes 

Keith 

Ham 

Dugan 

Bartlett 

W'aterhouse 

Hansbury 

Mac Arthur 

INDIVIDUAL 

Name 
Keane 
Arbuthnot 
Scafidi 
Keyes 
Roy 

Damiseau 
Dakin 
Cormier 
Borger 
Adams 
Mula 
Sweeney 
Erickson 
Williams 
Bartlett 

Totals 



13 
9 

10 
1 

1 
7 
2 
1 



10 
8 
9 
4 
1 
1 

•> 

1 



6 

4 



11 

13 

10 

2 

4 



Richard Tolan. '46. 



SCORING 

Field 

Goals 

68 

49 

38 

30 

22 

24 

10 

9 

7 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1 





VARSITY 



Free 
Throws 
28 
12 
28 
11 
16 

7 

1 

2 













1 



Total 

for season 

150 

110 

104 

71 

60 

55 

21 

20 

14 

6 

4 

4 

4 

2 

1 



267 106 




630 




r^vj 



JUNIOR VARSITY 
VARSITY LEAGUE GAMES 



Waltham 
♦Waltham 

*Waltham 
Waltham 

* Waltham 
Waltham 

*Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 

* Waltham 
-Waltham 

Waltham 



Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
-Waltham 



54 Cambridge Latin 

54 Watertown 

26 Arlington 

22 Newton 

46 Rindge Tech 

33 Brook line 

30 Cambridge Latin 

56 Watertown 

28 Arlington 

37 Brookline 

33 Newton 

40 Rindge Tech 

NON-LEAGUE GAMES 



36 
39 
32 
25 
39 



Maiden 

Belmont 

Med ford 

Somerville 

Waltham Trade 



* Indicates home game 

League — Waltham won 9 lost 3 
Non-League — Waltham won 4 lost 1 



Waltham 6 
JUNIOR V 



Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltrnm 
Waltham 



37 
31 
30 
22 
25 
37 
32 
34 
35 
28 
27 
38 



Totals — won 13 lost 4 

SCORING 

30 Opponents 417 

ARSITY LEAGUE GAMES 
Cambridge Latin 
Watertown 
Arlington 
Newton 
Rindge Tech 
Brookline 
Cambridge Latin 
Watertown 
Arlington 
Brookline 
Newton 
Rindge Tech 



NON-LEAGUE GAMES 



Waltham 1 1 

Waltham 26 
Waltham 15 

Waltham 33 

Waltham 49 
League — 
Xon-League — 



Maiden 

Belmont 

Med ford 

Somerville 

Waltham Trade 

Waltham won 12 lost 

Waltham won 3 lost 



23 
25 
27 
39 
26 
18 
31 
28 
18 
26 
27 
19 



23 
15 
29 

27 
16 



17 

9 
24 
21 

9 
18 
23 
21 
17 
16 
20 
20 



17 
19 
17 
25 
22 





2 



Total won 15 lost 2 
SCORING 
Waltham 510 Opponents 315 



BASKETBALL 




WALTHAM HIGH VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 

Left to right: Norman Roy, "Buttsy" Adams, Teddy Scafidi, 
Walter Keyes, Roy Arbuthnot, Rusty Mula, Ducky Keane, 
Eddie Borger, Bob. Damoiseau. 



& fi C C 6. 




WALTHAM HIGH BASKETBALL JAYVEES 
Standing: John Bent, Buddy Williams, Leonard Woods, Peter 

Yarossi, John Drury. 
Seated: Anthony Zaia, Fred Wills, "Red" Cormier, Teddy 

Erickson. 
Kneeling: Leon Simmons, Chester Muise, Al Scafidi, Wendell 

Flngelo. 



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A scramble for the ball in the exciting game which threw 
Newton over for its first loss of the season. Score 33 — 27. 





Roy Arbuthnot poised to toss one >>t Ins clevet passes 
against Cambridge Latin. 



It's off the Backboard as Teddy Scofidi leaps tor the 

rebound against Newton in the Orange and Hlaiks 

tiist and only defeat 01 the season. 




n u Walth 17 win 



BASKETBALL 



PREVIEWS AND REVIEWS 

In the middle of November, Coach Art Quinn 
called out his basketballers. For the first two 
weeks of practice the team looked rather shabby, 
but upon the completion of the football season 
such star hoopsters as Norman Roy, Bob Dakin, 
Bent, Al Scafidi, Rusty Mula, Campbell, Sweeney, 
and Teddy Erickson reported to Coach Quinn. 

The first team was composed of Keane, Arbuth- 
not, Keyes, Roy, and Scafidi with Cormier, Dakin, 
Mula, and Campbell as alternates, while the J. 
V.'s were loaded with talent such as Erickson, 
Al Scafidi, Cormier (later promoted to Varsity), 
Williams, Weatherbee, Bent, and Johnny Sweeney. 

Waltham started the season by warming up with 
two supposedly strong Greater Boston schools, 
Maiden and Belmont. In both of these contests 
the J. V.'s prevailed as the Varsity was vastly 
superior to Maiden and Belmont's varsities; thus 
the J. V.'s played the last half of both contests 
and also outscored their opponents. However, the 
Waltham J. V'.s lost to Maiden J. V.'s and to 
the spectator the Maiden juniors looked much 
better than their burly brothers, the varsity. 

Yes, indeed Basketball was the game at Wal- 
tham H. S. this year as the J. V.'s and Varsity 
combined to win a total of 28 games while losing 
a total of 6. Waltham lost Suburban league 
games to Newton (1), Arlington (1), Cambridge 
Latin ( 1 ) , and Greater Boston League Titilist 
Somerville. Although Waltham lost four games 
it must be pointed out that 3 of these games were 
lost by one basket or less and these games were 




lost while Waltham was in a bad slump. Wal- 
tham lost to Arlington by one point 27 • — 26, 
to Cambridge Latin by one point 31 — 30, and 
to Somerville by one basket 27 — 25. 

The season's highlight was Waltham's 33 to 
27 triumph over Tech-Tourney Newton which it 
had previously lost to at Newton 39 — 22, the 
Crimson's only real drubbing all season. A cocky 
Newton five came to Waltham one evening only 
to suffer its first and last Suburban League defeat 
of the year. The first half of this game found 
Waltham freezing the ball and Newton hanging 
on by a two and three point margin most of the 
game. Newton's Bob Scanlon was popping them 
in from all over the court, and it was this boy's 
fine shooting, combined with the guarding Whitey 
Weinstock's, who in the writer's opinion is the 
best guard seen in this part of the state these last 
three years, that kept Waltham from all but 
trouncing the Garden City lads. 

On this particular evening Waltham was su- 
perb. Ducky Keane was terrific; he couldn't be 
stopped and was easily the game's outstanding 
player. He handled the ball magnificently. Nor- 
man Roy was the boy who controlled the re- 
bounds; while Keyes, Arbuthnot and Scafidi did 
all the setting up. Time and again these boys hit 
Ducky with passes, but without Ducky's magic 
eye there would have been no scoring. He really 
was hot, as he displayed some of the finest of 
shooting, from the most difficult of angles, that 
has ever been seen in Waltham's gym. 

In my opinion the deciding factor of Waltham's 
victory over Newton was its ability to crack a 
zone defense. The Crimson lads really moved 
that apple around (they really threw it around as 
if it were a hot tamale) and in the end it paid 
off, for the Newton boys were dragging their 
tongues around the floor before it was time to 
draw the curtain. 

Newton must be congratulated upon its won- 
derful team. No one can say that a Newton team 
does not put on a good show, for they played 
their best brand of basketball. Waltham just 
couldn't be stopped, for they were on fire — and 
that's pretty hot. 

Here's hoping next year's lads are as good as 
this year's quintet and with boys such as Scafidi, 
Roy, and Cormier back again, I'm sure Waltham 
will win its share of games. 

Ernie Zeno. 



Girls' Sports 

BASKETBALL 




SENIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
Back row. left to right: Frances Barrow, Marjorie 

Gardner, Dorothy Giles, Phyllis Bryson, Janet 

Turner. 
Front row, left to right: Amelia Cardillo. Eileen 

Deveaux, Marie Dorval, Lorraine Olney. 




JUNIOR GIRJ S' BASK! IMAI I 1 1 am 

M.uv Koutoujiaxi 
Pttrida Meal, M.uv Howlejr, R.'s ( Scalia. 
/••••. tsabelle M tcKenzie, 

lois Coolidge, Anne Koundakjian, Julia 

P.-rctU 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



CHAPEL HILL AT WALTHAM 

To open the season of basketball, our first op- 
ponent \\ as Chapel Hill. Every one played a won- 
derful game with Phyllis Bryson as high scorer. 
The Waltham team defeated Chapel Hill 33 — 29. 

The summary for Waltham: 



Bryson 

Dorval 

Proctor 

Coolidge 

Koutoujian 

Olney 

Turner 

Barrow 

Giles 

Deveaux, E, 



Total 16 1 33 

NEEDHAM AT WALTHAM 

With Needham as one of our outstanding rivals 
of the season, the seniors vowed to beat them. 
Phyl Bryson was swishing them in one after an- 
other, and the senior guards made expert passes. 
Dotty Giles was Captain for the day. The score 
was 45 — 36 in favor of Waltham. 



Senior line-up: 

Bryson 

Dorval 

Gardner 

Cardillo 

Olney 

Barrow 

Giles 

Turner 

Deveaux, E. 



Totals 22 1 45 

Needham Juniors proved too great for the Wal- 
tham Junior Team for they were utterly defeated. 
Dot Haffey from Needham was high scorer with 
16 points to her credit. 

Junior line-up: 



Johnson 

Coolidge 

Koutoujian 

Howley 

MacKenzie 

Neal 

Poretta 

Scalia 

Kaundakjian, A. 



G. 


F. 


p. 


11 





22 


5 





10 


3 





6 


3 


1 


7 
















































Also, the Sophomores were among those de- 
feated. Their score was 28 — 37. Powerful 
Estelle Deveaux was high scorer for the Waltham 
Sophomores. 

Sophomore line-up: 



G. 


F. 


p. 




8 





16 


Henry 


2 





•T. 


Scholz 











Deveaux 


4 


1 


9 


Allen 


2 





4 


Koundakjian 











Bruneau 











Nile 











Schmidt 











Muise 














G. 


F. 


P. 











1 


1 


3 


6 


1 


13 


3 





6 


3 





6 







































Total 



13 



28 



WESTON AT WALTHAM 



As it is always tough to beat the dynamic Wes- 
ton teams, this time was no exception. It was 
an exciting game through to the finish, as you 
can see by the score — a 21 — 21 deadlock. 
Marie Dorval was high scorer and Captain for the 
day. 

First team line-up: 



Gardner 

Dorval 

Bryson 

Cardillo 

Giles 

Barrow 

Turner 

Deveaux, 



G. 


F. 


p. 


2 


1 


5 


3 


4 


10 


2 


2 


6 
















































Total 



21 



G. 


F. 


p. 















2 


1 


5 


MacKenzie 





1 


1 


Coolidge 


1 





2 


Howley 











Koutoujian 











Neal 











Poretta 











Scalia 











Koundakjian 



Waltham's second team was defeated by only 
one basket. The score was 7 — 9 in favor of 
Weston. Tricky, fast Isabelle MacKenzie racked 
up four points. 

Second team line-up: 



G. 


F. 


p. 


2 





4 


1 





2 





1 


1 
















































Total 



8 



Total 



Girls' Basketball 





SOPHOMORE GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

Bad row, left to right: Estella Deveau, Lorraine 
Bruneau, Margaret Waterman, Abbic Henry. 

Front row. left to right: Norma Schultz, Helen Muise, 
Margaret Koundakjian, Winona Nile. 






CAMBRIDGE LATIN AT 
CAMBRIDGE LATIN 
Cambridge was the only loss by Waltham's Sen- 
ior Team. It was a close game and a thrilling 
one. It was a matter of one basket that they won. 
Phyl Bryson, high scorer, tallied 6 baskets and 2 
foul shots. Marge Gardner came in second, 
chalking up 4 baskets. Our tricky guard, Janet 
Turner, was Capain for the day. 
Summary for Seniors: 

G. F 
6 



Bryson 

Dorval 

Cardillo 

Turner 

Dcveaux 

Onley 

Barrow 

( lardner 

(nles 



Total 



2 
1 




4 
• 

13 



2 
1 










p. 

14 

5 
2 





8 
o 



J 29 



The Junior Team played their Inst game of the 
season battling point for point in one of their 
narrowest games of the year. Lois Coolidge was 
high scorer, with io points I'at Neal displayed 
some timely passes and excellent guarding tech 
niquc. as usual. 



The Summary for Juniors: 

Coolidge 

Koutoujian 

Howley 

MacKenzie 

Neal 

Poretta 

Koundakjian 

Si alia 

Total 



G. 


F. 


p 


5 





10 


1 


1 


3 


2 





4 


2 





4 







































10 



21 



Although the Sophomores tried in vain to come 
out on top. they lost 23 16. Estellc Dcveaux 

was 1 1 1 c 1 1 SCOrer with "' points, and Abbie Hcnrv 
swished in some timely baskets for the losers 
which amounted to 6 points. 

Summary for Sophomores 



Dcveaux 

Henry 

Allen 

Koundakjian 

Bruneau 

\\ ..ti rrnan 

Nile 

Muise 

Total 



G 


l 


p. 


3 


l 


7 


J 





6 


i 





2 





l 


1 

















n 





















16 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



JUNIOR — SOPHOMORE 

The Junior-Sophomore game was an exciting 
one. The over-confident Juniors were jolted when 
the Sophs proved stronger than they had antici- 
pated and were out in the lead all the way. In 
the very last minutes of play, a Junior player 
charged in on the kill — it saved the day for 
the Juniors. 

Mary Howley tossed in a dozen points for the 
Juniors, while an up-and-coming Sophomore for- 
ward, Abbie Henry, got 12 points for the losers. 



The Sophomore line-up: 

Henry 

Deaveau 

Scholz 

Koundakjian 

Bruneau 

Nile 

Waterman 

Muise 

Total 

The Junior line-up: 

Howley 

Coolidge 

Johnson 

Koutoujian 

MacKenzie 

Neal 

Scolia 

Poretta 



G. 

6 

1 

1 




F. 


1 









12 
3 

2 





17 



G. 


F. 


p 


6 





12 


2 





4 




















1 





2 






























Total 



9 



18 



SENIOR — SOPHOMORE 



The Senior team gave the Sophomores quite a 
beating although the Sophomores, did put up a 
good fight. Estelle Deveau was high scorer for 
the Sophomores, and Marie Dorval was high 
scorer for the Seniors. 



The Senior line-up: 

Gardner 

Dorval 

Bryson 

Cardillo 

Giles 

Barrow 

Turner 

Onley 

Total 



G. 

1 
6 
4 
1 





12 



F. 


2 
1 








p. 

14 

9 
2 





2~ 



Sophomore line-up: 

Deveaux 

Henry 

Koundakjian 

Scholz 

Bruneau 

Waterman 

Nile 

Muise 

Total 



G 


F. 


P. 


3 


4 


10 


3 


1 


7 











1 





2 







































19 



SENIOR — JUNIOR 

Well it looks like the Seniors added another 
game to their credit I The Juniors displayed some 
tricky plays, and fast thinking in the clinches, but 
the Seniors' past experience and skilled forwards 
overwhelmed the Juniors 38 — 21. 

Marge Gardner, Senior, had a field day, toss- 
ing in 14 points. Isabelle MacKenzie, Junior, 
also had 14 points to her credit. 

Senior line-up: 



Gardner 

Dorval 

Bryson 

Cardillo 

Giles 

Barrow 

Onley 

Turner 



G 


F. 


p. 


7 





14 


6 





12 


2 


2 


6 


2 





4 







































Total 
Junior line-up: 

Johnson 

Coolidge 

MacKenzie 

Koutoujian 

Howley 

Neal 

Poretta 

Scalia 

Koundakjian 

Total 



17 



38 



G 


F. 


p. 


1 


1 


3 


2 





4 


7 





14 

























































10 



21 



ALL-STARS VERSUS ALUMNI 



There was a large turn out of enthusiastic spec- 
tators to see the annual alumni game between the 
High-school Grads and the Girls' All-Star Varsity 
team. 

This year there was an added attraction, as the 
Boys' Alumni Team played the Crimson Varsity 
Basketball Squad the same evening. The Crimson 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Squad won by a wide margin, although they had 
good opposition. 

The All-Star Girls' Team was defeated in their 
last game by the Girls' Alumni composed of stars 
from past years, which proved a walloping com- 
bination and producing mounting points. 

Alisca Cullen, picked most athletic girl in 19 14, 
was high scorer with 20 points. Phyl Bryson was 
high scorer for the All-Stars with 6 points, and 
Marie Dorval and Lois Coolidge followed up with 
four apiece. 

Although there were heartbreaks for some and 
glory for others, everyone enjoyed playing the 
wonderful sport — basketball. 

The All-Star line-up: 



Bryson 

Dorval 

Gardner 

Cardillo 

Coolidge 

Olney 

Bruneau 

Giles 

Neal 



G. 


F. 


p. 


3 





6 


2 





4 





2 


2 











2 





4 







































Alumni line-up: 

Cullen 

Palumbo 

Alisceo 

Cousins 

Newcome 

Harpoothian 

Koundakjian 

Christiansen 

Total 



G. 


F. 


p. 


10 





20 


4 


1 


9 


1 





2 


1 





2 


1 





J 






























17 



VARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD 



Total 



16 



Frances Barrow 
Lorraine Bruneau 
Phyllis Brvson 
Amerlia Cardillo 
Lois Coolidge 
Marie Dorval 
Marjorie Gardner 
Patty Waterman 
Janet Turner 
Lorraine Olney 
Dorothy Giles 
Isabel MacKenzie 
Patiicia Neal 



guard 

guard 

forward 

forward 

forward 

forward 

forward 

guard 

guard 

guard 

guard 

forward 

guard 



35 



FAREWELL 
By Marjorie C Gardner 

It is time to say good-bye to high-school days 
anil time to start remembering the hours of fun 
and companionship which we have enjoyed here 
together. Nothing will ever be able to bring back 
the thrill of winning our first basketball game or 
making our very first basket, but we will fee] 
pride surge over us everytime the Class of 1946 
is mentioned. 

We'd like to thank Miss Sew all and Miss 
( lulds, our physical education instructors, who 
taught us that there is more in a game than the 
winning. All we girls agree that they are top- 
notch in every w av 

Just the words. ( lass of 1946, bring back un- 
told memories which we have stored up inside. 
Stored up for the day when we can reach I 
and grasp a few hours of happiness by just rem- 
iniscing, liven though we may be verv busy or 
move away from W.iltham whenever we hear or 

read thai W.iltham is playing for the champion- 
ship, or that W.iltham |ust lost a game, our hearts 
will be w ith them all the waj 



BOWLING 

Every Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon the 
girls of Waltham High tried their skill at the 
Brentwood Alleys, and what results' We not 
only bowled, but we had an opportunity to watch 
some of the girls roll some "high" ones. We 
particularly noticed Dot Lock hart s bowling form; 
Millie s friend the pin-boy; Deveauz rolling up 
the strikes uid spares, .ind Red's" favorite alley 
(I still think there is a groove in the middle | 

i 5, we had loads of fun — but bowling can 
be very discouraging at times Some days we 
found that the balls refused to knock down an\- 
thing. (We speak from experience ) But we had 
Our good days. too. 

At this writing, bowling is still in progl 

ac arc unable to give- vou the high bow 
ol the season and the individual averages w 
have a student-faculty bowling match coming up 
too. together with the All-star bowling I om- 

peting for the championship 

(To i S tli in We find that lumping helps 
|ust as the ball is hitting the pins Have vour 
team mates jump, too. It all he I; 



Girls' Field Hockey 




Our capable goalie. Sherlie Babb. confronts the 

camera man with her friendly rival, the 

Weston goal guardian. 




GIRLS FIELD HOCKEY TEAM 

Standing: Abbie Henry, Mary Hawley, Phyllis Bryson, 

Lorraine Bruneau, Gracey Magrath, Sherlie Babb, 

Dorothy Giles, Marie Dorval, Vera Allen. 

• . ling: Joan Home, Amelia Cardillo, Marjorie Gardner, 

Barbara Johnson, Barbara Bigham, Lorraine Olney. 






Weston opponent. 
Marje Gardner faces off with her 



Barbie Bigham, Dot Giles, and Barb Johnson in the 
middle of a brisk scrimmage against Weston High. 



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l Waverley Oaks Ro.nl 
\\ altham 



Please P.itmni/c our Advertisers 



Compliments of . . . 



Compliments of . . . 



MILLER OIL CO. ! 



MARTIN G. BECKER 



Miller Oil Co. 

69.RIVERST.'WALTHAM.MASS 



ORGAN SERVICE 






---«»■' -^»< -^m- --^m- ■■■***■■••• X i 






Compliments of . . 



J Merit Paper and 

Chemical Corporation 



119 PEARL STREET, BOSTON 



Hancock 2733 



Compliments of . . . 



W. T. GRANT CO. 



305 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



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FOR GIRLS 
ABOUT TO 
GRADUATE 




(j pportunities now for 

IMPORTANT PUBLIC SERVICE 

For girls who want more than "just a job," and 
who are eager for an interesting career in 
public service, there are opportunities now 
with the New England Telephone Company. 

You'll find the surroundings pleasant; your 
co-workers congenial. And you'll get training 
that will always be valuable. 

Girls of the Senior Class should investigate 
this opportunity. Training courses may be ar- 
ranged so as not to interfere with studies and 
can usually he given right in the home town. 

Your teitiher or roc.ttiouul .ii/thor c.iu tell 
you more .ihttut uork in thi\ inttrtsting ttutttttrj, 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



-•:• 



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Compliments of . . . 



For Graduation 



WALTHAM 



PHARMACY, INC. 



GRADUATION 



NAME CARDS 



257 Moody Street Corner Orange j 



Waltham 4784 






ROF JOHNSTON'S 
TIRE SHOP 



KRAFT SYSTEM RECAPPING 

VULCANIZING 

BATTERIES 

929 MAIN STREET 
Waltham 4975 



W. S. VARNEY PRINTING j 

i 

j COMPANY I 

I ( 

j 909 Main Street Corner Rich Street j 

i i 

! Waltham 1182 ! 

i I 

i ) 

i i 

( LOOKING AHEAD ? ? ? j 

i i 

i _ i 

! American Employment 

i I 

Exchange 

' ! 

I 127 Federal Street ! 

i I 

I Boston. 

i 

I Liberty 2970 

! | 

I Many excellent positions available for 

i ; 

I beginner Secretaries, Typists, 

i 

| Bookkeepers, and Clerks. 



A»n^»i>« 



■■ «» ,+*»• <-* 



■ " -m^- i , «c» i ■* 



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i 
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I Compliments of . . . 



! 



! 
! 

! Nonie's Cake Kitchen 

! 

1 



470 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



Harry A. Starr Fuel 
Company 

"Serves You Right" 

Automatic Heating Equipment I 
Thermostats 

420 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 

Waltham 0884 




Graduation Special 

12—4 x 6 and 1—8 x 10 Etching Style 

Portraits $8.00 

25—4 x 6 and 1 — 8 x 10 Etching Style 

Portraits Si L00 

50—4 x 6 and 1—8 x 10 Framed $22.00 

Glossy print with < rder — gem 

selection of proofs 

DAVID PHIPPS STUDIO 

873 A MAIN STR1 1 1 

WAI tlum M31 



* 



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BALTIMORE 



j Compliments of . . . 



! 



TAILOR. FURRIERS, DYERS 



Call and Delivery 



767 Main Street 



Waltham 2300 



r 



Compliments of . . . 



j Compliments of . . . 



EXCHANGE 



SHOP 



880 MAIN STREET 



Waltham 5718 



>69 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



I 



» 

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CLEANERS, INC. IDEAL CONCRETE ! 



BLOCK COMPANY 

MASON'S SUPPLIES 

Waltham 3206 - 3207 

232 Lexington Street 
Waltham 



CRYSTAL FRUIT j JEANETTE'S CAKE j 



i 



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J. LOPEZ 



' RUSSO ART STUDIO 



Complete Line of 



Photographs For All Occassions 



GROCERIES, FRUITS, 



Commercial and Portrait 



VEGETABLES, and CANDIES 



Photographers 



91 5 Main Street 



Waltham 4568-M 



353 MOODY STREET 



Waltham 4881 






i 



THE POTTER PRESS I 



1 CHAMPION STORES 



i 



INC 



i 



515 SOt ITH STREET 



W'AI/J'HAM 



'//'» Hard to Beat a Champion" 



IW Y< I.I S, IW V( LES SI PPLIES 



WALtham 2900 



( VPitol 7222 



RADIOS. 



SPORTING GOO IV* 



I 

1 Everything foi Youf Home and Aut«> 



N1< >< >l ^ MKI I I 



t 



\\ .Ith.nn i 



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«> 



HERBERT T. SPENCER 



Compliments of . . . 



INTERIOR FURNISHINGS 



Custom Made Shades 



Fine Cabinet Work and 
Upholstering 

Draperies — Floor Coverings 
Awnings — Screens 



708 Main Street 



WALtham 2680 



i 

i 

Waltham j 
( 
I 



Washington Jewelry 
Company 



312 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 



i ~ 



\ Compliments of . . . 



WALTHAM COAL 



COMPANY 



j Compliments of . . . 

i 



Delicious Toasted Sandwiches 

Homemade Candies and 
Ice Cream 



! CANDYLAND SHOP ! 



Established 1872 



475 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



Telephone Waltham 3679 






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Waltham 1985-M 



Irish Setters 



PUPPIES ALWAYS ON HAND 



E. H. BROWN 



42 Waverley Oaks Road 



Waltham 5757 



C. F. CASHMAN 



Bicycles Repaired 
Keys Made 

Skates Sharpened 

Model Planes and 

Bicycle Accessories Sold 

55 Prospect Street 

Waltham 



I 



Compliments of 



WARRFN KAY VANTINE STUDIO 



160 Boylston Street 



Boston. Massachusetts 



Hancock 07 (3 



>c P.itrom/c our Ailvcrti 



l 



I COLONIAL KITCHEN | 



j _ 

S 

i 

i 
i 



The Home of Better Foods 



19 CRESCENT STREET 



Telephone Waltham 4010 



Established 1872 



j H. L. Stone Dairy 

i 

I 

j Phone WALtham 0227 

j 

| 1295 MAIN STREET 

j WALTHAM 

i 
j 

j "Waltham* 's Oldest — 

i 

j Most Modern Dairy" 

\ 

i 
i 



j Compliments of . . 



RICHARD H. BIRD 



ANDERSON 

Florist 
Tel. WALtham 1843 



19 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM 
MASSACHUSETTS 



! 



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Perfect Diamonds 
Watches 

Cash or Budget 

Weston's Upstairs 
Jewelry Store 

Second Floor 
353 MOODY STREET 



FRANK H. DEMEO 

Incorporated 

WALTHAM RUG AND 
FURNITURE COMPANY 



623 - 629 Moody Street 
WALtham 5561 

Electrical Appliances 
Floor Coverings — Furniture 

"Quality Merchandise at a Saving" 



WATCH CITY TAXI SERVICE 



Cadillacs For All Occasions 



TAXI 



CALL WALTHAM 5000 



673 MAIN STREET (Corner Common Street) WALTHAM I 



— 24 - Hour Sen ice — 



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>i.«Z Fl ..^i>^<>4 






►";-«»• 'i ■«■■»■"-« 



I »;■<■»' 



JOSEPH O'NEIL 

OPTOMETRIST 

Examination by Appointment 

FLYNN BUILDING 

657 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM 

8:30 A. M. — 5:00 P. M. 
WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS 

7 to 8:30 P. M. 



National Clothing 



Stores, Inc. 



From Manufacturer to Wearer 



Specializing in High Grade Clothes 
For Men, Students, and Boys 

373 MOODY STREET 






MILTON H. DOORE 

Jenny Service Station 

Moody and Ash Streets 
Waltham 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 



JACK KARDON 

KARDON BROS. GROCERY 

43 Bedford Street 
Waltham 4065 






( 



» < > <^»< >-^»< > -«»-< >^^o«b»< >-mm-t »« 



+ >--*^-"<ZX>-<>-9 



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Compliments of . . . 



JEAN'S 
LUNCHEONETTE 



220 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 

! 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, Jr., Proprietor j 

i 



NEWALL CO. 



107 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Waltham 1824 



Compliments of . . . 



WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 



AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



716 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



MASSACHUSETTS 



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! 
! 
! 



H>«»li*»'i«»i'«*"^»"«^i | l»i'«»' l, <» ll «»"«» ,| < 



i 



53 PROSPECT STREET 
Waltham 1985-M 



I LEARY'S MARKET j 



HARVARD DRUG 
COMPANY 



830 MAIN STREET 
Waltham 3854 

Maurice C. Brill, Ph. G., Reg. Phar 



» 



m. 



! 
! 

( Compliments of . . . 



i 






Compliments of . . . 



\ ALLEN KNITWEAR 

j Complete Line of 

i BATHING SUITS and SWEATERS 



331 Moody Street 
Waltham 



JIMMIES BARBER 
SHOP 



913 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



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FRANKS LUNCH 



CARMINE NARDONH. PROF. 



EXCELLENT FOODS 



L50 River Street 



OLDSMOBILE DEALERSHIP 



New and Used Cars 



GENERAL REPAIRING 



B. and B. MOTOR 



COMPANY 



W.illham 



Waltham 5495 



955 MAIN STREET 



Waltham 0782 



Compliments of . . . 



ROGERS PHARMACY 



INC. 



Brentwood Alleys 



JOHN J ROGERS Rej Pharm. 



923 MAIN STRI II 



\\ \l I HAM 



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i 



! 



i 



•:• 



GOOD LUCK 



STAMPS 



to the i 

I 

GRADUATING CLASS ! 



from the ( 

! 

I 

IV-B CLUB ! 

i 
i 

"The only Club with 14 Presidents'' 



BUY UNITED STATES 
i 

I i 

SAVINGS BONDS AND 

i 

i 

i 



! 
i 
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! I 



! 



• i 



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<S- 



DOWCETT BROS. 
THE STUCCO SPA i 



"Where The) Meet" 



Arthur F. Cox 



Propru tor 



Local Distributors 

of 

MOBILHEAT 



... j 



NEWTON SASH and DOOR COMPANY 



INC. 



of Waltham 



216 Newton Street 



Waltham 4 (20-4421 



I ir AHvertivts 



♦-♦'■«^<)'^^M-«^ll-^^O^i»ll- 






I Compliments of . . . 



THE 



EMBASSY THEATRE 



l 
| 

) Compliments of . . . 

i 
i 

! ELLISON PARK 

MARKET 



"The Best in Food" 



470 Main Street 
Waltham 3080 



»<>-«»<>^M*>^^*(X^B'0^^»l>«»0-« r •O^D^IK 






Compliments of . . . 



I Compliments of . . . 

i 



1 

i STORER and WELLS ! PATTI BROS., INC 

i 



220 Felton Street 
Waltham 1308 



876 Main Street 
Waltham 



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! 
! 

I Compliments of 

! 

! 



Compliments of . . . 



! 

j PAGE BROS. OIL CO. 

i 1011 MAIN STREET 



WAI.THAM. MASS. 



MISS ANTOINETTE'S 



20th Century Stage 



School 



— 



1 Compliments of . . . 



STANLEY 



E. ANDREWS 



B. J. POOLE 

(.1 NERAL AUTO REPAIRS 
24-Hour Towing Service 

\\ .ilth.im VMM) 



PI c.isc I'.itrnni/c our ,V1\crh*e«s 



i 



Compliments of . . . 
I 



I 

i 
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i 

i 



{ Compliments of . . . 



WALTHAM 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



"THE WALNUT TREE" 



FOR YOUR 



DINING PLEASURE 



975- A Main Street 
Waltham 3628 



11:30 — 2:00 



5:30 — 8:00 



Waltham 4885 



j ks 

i 



j Compliments of . . . 

i 
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Compliments of . . . 



LA ROSA'S MARKET 



MR. and MRS. 



"Everything Good to Eat" 

120 Willow Street 
Waltham Mass. 



-i 



! BERNARD S. RESH ! 



Waltham 0709 



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FAMOSI CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 



Builders and Ge leral Contractors 



393 Trapelo Road 



Belmont 



Roofing and Sidewalks 
Carpentry and Cabinet Work 



General Remodeling 



Painting and Decorating 



Plastering and Masonry 



Belmont 4477 



Walthani 4409 



Free Estimates Promptly Given 



isc Pitroni/c our AdvettiseM 



Compliments of . . . 



Inc. 

80 BACON STREET 

Waltham 54, Massachusetts 

Makers of Small Manufacturing 
feu els and Instrument Lathes 



) Compliments of . . . 



Clement Lathe Works 



G M. STARMER 



1284 Massachusetts Avenue 



BOSTON 



Telephone Geneva 8411 



! SOCONY SERVICE STATION ! 



THOMAS A. JOYCE j 



Real Estate 



135 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



Waltham 2815 



PHILIP E. BURKE 



113 CRESCENT STREET 



WALTHAM 



WALTHAM 1900 



Furniture Moving 
and Storage 



Interstate Service 

Crating — Shipping 

Fireproof Warehouse 



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• ^» ™ . 



SPENCER 



SHOE STORE 



Office Equipment 



( )lhce Supplies 



MOODY 

STATIONERY CO., 

INC. 



Moody and Spruce Streets 



Waltham 



Rav A. Newby. Manager 

o 



377 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 

Waltham 3806 






Real Estate 



Insurance 



I 



For Better Property Listing j READ and WHITE 



( onsull 

Brown and Benson 



I 



1 I I Summer Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



ioo ( rescenl Streel 



Waltham i«)oo 



I ADH S AND Ml N S 
Formal Wear 

I a Rent 



^c Patronize <>ur AiKcrh 



Compliments of . . 



) Compliments of . . . 



E. E. BUTMAN 
COMPANY 



ANDERSON'S 
HOME BAKERY 



Drugs 



465 MAIN STREET 



437 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



Waltham 0107 



Friendly Service 

i 

I BRENTON E. TYLER 
I 

| INSURANCE 

i 

i Real Estate 



Compliments of . . . 



BOB'S 



ESSO STATION 



682 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



Waltham 4808 



576 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



I 



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I* 



Compliments of . . . 



) Compliments of . . . 



HOWARD CLOCK 



PRODUCTS, INC. 



FRIEND 



Like to help an 
Exporter? 

A Cosmopolitan Job — Foreign Trade Secretary 

The world will bo your neighbor . . . you'll 
be in constant touch with distant lands and 
foreign peoples. You will deal with customs. 
immigration, exports and imports. A very 
interesting job . . . but one which requires 
specialised training! 

Fither offers thorough training to young 
women who want preferred positions in 
the profession; or business. 2-year Foreign 
Trade, Medical. legal. Radio Secretarial 
courses. Also 2-year Executive Secretarial, 
I-vear Stenographic and Finishing Secreta- 
rial. Successful placement. Dormitories. 

Illustrated catalog tells how ICVefl typical 
Fisher graduates found happs . worthwhile 
careers. Write today. 

Tistm school 



l 




118 B#«con 5»-.o' Boston 1*. Matt 
374 Broadway Winter Hill 45. Matt 



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i A. W. RECKA DAIRY j 

i 



Dairy Products 



Compliments of . . . 



JENSEN JEWELRY CO. 



Waltham 



333 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



*-o^^<->^^t>-mm-<*^m-f>m^< > -4^*- -^^- ■^m^ ■**»■< 



Compliments of . . . 



FRANK C. HEALEY 



I 



SOUTH SIDE MARKET 



REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 



728 Moody Street 
Waltham 



333 Moody Street, Waltham 



Waltham 4480 



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rv%. 






^ First watch using standardized, interchangeable 
parts and all made under one roof. 

•fa First watch company to make the smallest round 
ladies' watch in America. 

fa First really thin American pocket watch. 

fa First in America with the smallest rectangular 
ladies' watch. 

fa First railroad watch in the world built to railroad 
specifications. 



fa Tomorrow, there will be new Waltham "firsts" . . . 
smartly styled . . . wonderfully precision-made. 



WALTHAM 




afsr-taSZZ- 



(M-t* 



WALTHAM WATCH COMPANY. WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



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